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Thread: In your opinion: Rudiments?

  1. #1

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    Default In your opinion: Rudiments?

    In your opinion (because I treasure it), what are the top 5 to 7 (in order) rudiments that should be practiced and mastered?

    What is more important, speed or technique?

    I'm asking because I feel like my speed is lacking but my technique and accuracy are both getting better as I practice.

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    I think that technique is a must. Because if you're technique is messed up, you could ended up with carpal-tunnel. Speed comes with experiance.
    "Music is always an experiment."

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    Technique is a must, speed will come with practice and dedication. But in terms of rudiments practice all of them somewhat equally. In my opinion, diddle rudiments cover a lot of the technique and speed you will need in later, more advanced rudiments. Also, diddle rudiments tend to build muscle memory faster, quicker. Just like when you log on to your DRUMCHAT account, you've probably done it so many times you don't even have to think about where your fingers are moving on the keypad! Once you have built muscle memory in a particultar rudiment and you no longer have to think about what your playing... Thats when the speed clicks, and you can start getting those exercises really fast.
    DRUM NAKED!

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    That was explained very well PF, thanks so much!

    Quote Originally Posted by PerpetualFrog
    Technique is a must, speed will come with practice and dedication. But in terms of rudiments practice all of them somewhat equally. In my opinion, diddle rudiments cover a lot of the technique and speed you will need in later, more advanced rudiments. Also, diddle rudiments tend to build muscle memory faster, quicker. Just like when you log on to your DRUMCHAT account, you've probably done it so many times you don't even have to think about where your fingers are moving on the keypad! Once you have built muscle memory in a particultar rudiment and you no longer have to think about what your playing... Thats when the speed clicks, and you can start getting those exercises really fast.

  5. #5

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    just to confirm that, technique is better then speed!

    i don't know what 5 or 7 main rudiments are but i do know 3 MAJOR ones that are absolutely essential to getting the other 37 (single stoke) (double stroke) (paradiddle)

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    Flams are fun to use and are easy to learn.
    Every drummer has used them, no doubt about it, they are also probably tomost useful of all rudiments on a kit.
    They aren't rudiments but if you get good with triplets, you can do some funny things with em.
    Single Stroke rolls are fun top play around with. Neil Peart and Mike Portnoy use them alot!
    Get aquainted with diddles (some people call em ruffs).

    Talk to HellsBells58, he knows more about them than i do.
    "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer."
    - Henry David Thoreau

    My set: Sonor Force 2003 Fusion Kit. 16" B8 Thin Crash, 20" B8 Ride, 16" Wuhan China, 14" B8 hi-hats, 10" AAX Splash
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  7. #7

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    Thanks CC!

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    Anytime, but like I said, Talk to HB he knows more than I do.
    "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer."
    - Henry David Thoreau

    My set: Sonor Force 2003 Fusion Kit. 16" B8 Thin Crash, 20" B8 Ride, 16" Wuhan China, 14" B8 hi-hats, 10" AAX Splash
    PDP Double bass Pedal, PDP throne.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Candlelight Chaos
    Flams are fun to use and are easy to learn.
    Every drummer has used them, no doubt about it, they are also probably tomost useful of all rudiments on a kit.
    They aren't rudiments but if you get good with triplets, you can do some funny things with em.
    Single Stroke rolls are fun top play around with. Neil Peart and Mike Portnoy use them alot!
    Get aquainted with diddles (some people call em ruffs).

    Talk to HellsBells58, he knows more about them than i do.
    Ahhh... It's nice to think that people think of me when they think about their rudiments.

    Actually CC, Ruffs are also known as Drag Rudiments. Drags involve playing a quick double stroke with one hand before playing your accented hit. See here.

    In answer to your question drum_chick, the most important basic rudiments to learn are the single stroke roll, double stroke roll, single paradiddle, flam and drag. Learning these 5 rudiments are the gateway to the other 35. All of the others are built off of these, sometimes combining elements of both e.g. the Flam-a-diddle or Drag-a-diddle.

    Again, I re-iterate. Technique is much, much more important than speed. Playing the rudiment steadily and correctly will allow you to improve your speed of the rudiment much faster than attempting to play it quickly from the start. Basically, Technique and Speed go hand in hand, but proper technique is essential to maximise the speed that you can go to.

    HB58
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    Rudiments?

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    Single stroke, Double Stroke, Parraddiddle (and parradiddle pyramids), Moeller (i think that's how it is spelt), flams, and bouncing/rolling (don't know if there is a technical term for it, just where you force the bounce of the stick on the head). Then all of the above (except moeller and bounce) on feet aswell, apparently, although I am yet to do this myself.
    "What consumes your mind, controls your life" - So, what consumes your mind?

  11. #11

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    As for technique vs speed, I am not gonna comment because everyone else has said it for me.
    "What consumes your mind, controls your life" - So, what consumes your mind?

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    All right, clear then. But now you've got to tell the principles of a good technique: Rithm, steadyness, what?...how do you get it; Practice with metronome and mirror?

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by hellsbells58
    Again, I re-iterate. Technique is much, much more important than speed. Playing the rudiment steadily and correctly will allow you to improve your speed of the rudiment much faster than attempting to play it quickly from the start. Basically, Technique and Speed go hand in hand, but proper technique is essential to maximise the speed that you can go to.

    HB58
    Good, I needed to hear this because I'm getting frustrated with my speed, my left hand is dragging behind my right and it's just really ticking me off! I did finally get the flam tap (only took me four hours LOL).......... And last night my left stick tip bounced directly into my left eye! OUCH!

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaman
    All right, clear then. But now you've got to tell the principles of a good technique: Rithm, steadyness, what?...how do you get it; Practice with metronome and mirror?
    Rythm, control (of speed and hardness), accuracy (hitting the middle of the skin as opposed to clacking on the edge of the tom for example) things like that. The how to get it is using the types of rudiments described by members above. Doing them over and over and over, controling the speed and volume and slowly increasing your speed as you get more and more comfortable. I don't think a mirror is necassary (others might disagree), but a metronome most definately is. Some people can get away without it, but it makes learning timing and controling your speed easier. That is why I am wanting one.

    Things like posture and seating position, drum positions etc... are, I think, completely personal, so when I hear people say "Sit this way" or "Position your tom at this angle" - i think, but that's what's good for you and your limbs and your style. So as far as that sought of thing is concerned, people should just do what feels best and allows them the most comfort and movement/freedom - that is why I think a mirror isn't necassary. Others may think differently, and I invite them to give their reasons.
    Now of I could only take my own advice........
    "What consumes your mind, controls your life" - So, what consumes your mind?

  15. #15

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    chutter cheese and book reports!! lol
    I've had it with your no talent, wannabe gangster ***! You wanna prove once and for all that I'm better than you? Strap up!--drumline

    our drumline doesn't do skanks!!! so get out!! thanks... lol

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