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Thread: advice for newbie??

  1. #1

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    Default advice for newbie??

    Hey everyone,just purchased a set of pearl vision sst birch drum set and was wondering what advice you have for practicing?I got them to throw in a couple of beginner books with cd's for learning.It starts off teaching you notation and then adds a piece at a time with short music intro's or whatever.Should I just keep practicing these over and over?Thanks for the advice.

  2. #2

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    Hi drummerguy and welcome to drum chat!
    You didn't mention your age but I highly advise taking some private lessons from a qualified drum instructor. There are also lots of free drum lessons available online. Drum Bum has a database at their website that links to most of them:

    .......... Free Drum Lessons

    Keep in mind, there are also many drum books, cd's, and videos on the market that could be very helpful to you. And of course if you have any questions, there are a lot of knowledgeable people here. Ask any time and we'll help if we can.
    - Tom

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  3. #3

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    Wellcome!!

    It is a good idea just like in athletics to develop a good warm up routine. Try starting out just working on single stroke rolls. Start slow with quarter notes, then go to 8ths, then 16ths, then 32nds, then back down to 16ths, 8ths, etc. Play quater notes on the bass drum, and Hi hat while doing this. This will get the blood flowing, and loosen you up a little. Try to have no tension in your arms and shoulders while playing especially during the warm up. Start slow increase the tempo gradually.
    Gretsch Catalina Birch 6 piece fusion set (10,12,14,16in. Toms, 22 Bass). Sabian 20" HH Classic Ride, 16" Istanbul Agop Dark Crash, & Zildian K 13" Hi-hats.

  4. #4

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    I suggest playing along to recorded music as often as possible. It will help you build a strong sence of timing. Most of todays recorded music is so precisely timed, it will really help build your internal meter.

    Practicing (especially for a newbie player) should be fun. Nothing will turn a new player away from the instument faster than boring stuff that feels like work. Dont get me wrong, being a good player takes losts of hard work... but you need to have fun with it, to continue building your interest in playing.

    A healthy dose of fundamentals, mixed with stuff you really enjoy listening to, will build your strengths as a new player.
    Matt G.
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  5. #5

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    Default hummm boring rudiment

    welcome home brother

    yes like other said have fun is the first thing to do

    after some fun you should learn some rudiment single stroke, double ,triplet etc

    and feel the music and grouve it

    have fun whith your new set

    Riouel

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by VegasDrummer69 View Post
    I suggest playing along to recorded music as often as possible. It will help you build a strong sence of timing. Most of todays recorded music is so precisely timed, it will really help build your internal meter.

    Practicing (especially for a newbie player) should be fun. Nothing will turn a new player away from the instument faster than boring stuff that feels like work. Dont get me wrong, being a good player takes losts of hard work... but you need to have fun with it, to continue building your interest in playing.

    A healthy dose of fundamentals, mixed with stuff you really enjoy listening to, will build your strengths as a new player.
    i guess jammin with music, which i do quit often is a fun way to play to a click track huh. lol

  7. #7

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    Default advice for newbie??

    Quote Originally Posted by drummerguy View Post
    Hey everyone,just purchased a set of pearl vision sst birch drum set and was wondering what advice you have for practicing?I got them to throw in a couple of beginner books with cd's for learning.It starts off teaching you notation and then adds a piece at a time with short music intro's or whatever.Should I just keep practicing these over and over?Thanks for the advice.
    Actually, we're all right!

    As drummer said, find a good professional instructor (depending on where you bought the drums, the person who sold you the drums may be a drum teacher!)...it's important to learn the rudiments, and that's where the books and CDs come in. And playing along with records and CDs will help you get used to playing with other instruments (live musicians are best, of course, but these are obviously easier to use! )

    I mentioned this in another thread, but you might want to invest in the "Turn it Up and Lay it Down" CD series...you should be available to find them in music stores or through the 'Net...

    Have fun as you start to...
    keep the beat goin' ... Don't keep it to yourself!

    Charlie

    "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away." --Henry David Thoreau, "Walden," 1854

    "There's a lot to be said for Time Honored tradition and value." --In memory of Frank "fiacovaz" Iacovazzi

    "Maybe your drums can be beat, but you can't."--Jack Keck

  8. #8

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    I use a couple of the "Turn it up, Lay it Down" CDs in teaching and they're great. Highly recommended.
    - Tom

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  9. #9

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    Welcome drummerguy! I am a relative newbie, too. I started on a kit on March, and I'm having an absolute blast. I would suggest, along with learning the basic rudiments (learn single stroke rools, double stroke rolls, triple stroke rolls, paradiddles, and flams first- they are the building blocks for all the rudiments), I would suggest that you learn the basic beat (hi-hat, snare, and bass drum pattern) for the style of music that you enjoy listening to the most (very slow at first, until you get the rhythm of the limbs, and gradually speed it up). That will give you the ability to play a basic beat with the music that you listen to - you know, the FUN stuff!
    Quoting gonefishin: Just have some bacon with ya when you go pick her up..........youre an instant chick magnet.


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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by pastor_bob View Post
    (learn single stroke rools, double stroke rolls, triple stroke rolls, paradiddles, and flams first- they are the building blocks for all the rudiments)
    You forgot the drag.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnysimmo View Post
    You forgot the drag.
    Which, as my dog would tell you, used to be called the "ruff!"
    - Tom

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  12. #12

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    Ah. I get whats coming to me for trying to be a smart arse.

  13. #13

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    Actually I like the drag. I think it sounds pretty cool on a drum roll through the toms. I was sort of thinking about working on the really basic rudiments first. I think of the drag/ruff as a variation of single strokes.
    Quoting gonefishin: Just have some bacon with ya when you go pick her up..........youre an instant chick magnet.


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  14. #14

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    I never really got the flam. I just slam both sticks down at the same time xD
    Today, on Ethel The Frog...

  15. #15

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    Well. My tips are to work on the basic rudiments, single stroke rolls, double stroke rolls, triple stroke rolls, paradiddles, flams and drags. A good place to learn these is here: http://www.vicfirth.com/education/rudiments.html

    Another tip is to play along to songs that you like. It'll help you develoupe good time.

    A third tip is to make sure that you have a correct grip. If you are sure that you have a correct grip i think you should make sure to practice endurance. Itll improve your speed

    A fourth tip is to try and learn to play beats from different styles of music. This will make you a more versatile drummer.

    Hope that helps! Good luck!

  16. #16

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    Welcome drummerguy, the rest of the guys have said it all, just have fun it will start to fall into place eventually, but it will also be very frustrating and you will always come back for more that's the thing about the drums. learn at your own pace and if you opt for a teacher like some of us have ,get one you can get along with. You have come to the right place for advice and chat. there are so many experienced and friendly guys on here.


  17. #17

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    first off congrats on the purchase of your new visions. i finally got to tune and play one recently. i was a little wary as i never liked the sound of the drums they replaced (exports). i will say that these are a HUGE improvement in sound and quallity. the laquored finish is beautiful. and i like that it came with 2 ply heads. these sound alot better than the single ply clear protones that came with the export. i think pearl has really hit the mark with these drums. they were steadily falling behind mapex, gretsch and sonor in the intermedeate drum market. i can say that the visions are right up there with with the catalina and mapex pro m. they may not be 100% birch but have great tone and are easy to tune thnx to the brass lug inserts. the new 900 series hardware that it comes with is built well too.

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