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Thread: Bass drum Kick pedal

  1. #1

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    Default Bass drum Kick pedal

    I have tried and tried to resolve this problem and cant seem to do it so ill ask here.

    When i begin playing I place my about half way up the kick pedal of the base and as I keep playing my foot always heads north and the end of my foot runs into the top of the kick pedal//

    What else can be done to stop this ..

    I wish they made a kick pedal that was just a button i could press with my foot..lol...

    its driving me to drink..

  2. #2

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    LOL..any excuse for a beer if ya ask me! Its a common thing aunkster dont worry. Your foot becomes more comfortable on the pedal after time and it will not slide up anymore when you develop more control. It used to happen to me and still does sometimes but not as often. I find my foot is lighter on the pedal now and has more control. And just like the sticks feel smoother in time, so does the pedal.

    You could try playing with some light sneakers that have grip on them but unfortunately your foot will still slide up for now .

  3. #3

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    Try it in your bare feet after jogging a few laps lol. Like livewire said, it will naturally resolve itself sooner or later. You could try playing heel down for better control over your pedals and feet, that would help for a jazzier style. If you like the power you get from heel up then don't change it.
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by 32ndHeartBeat View Post
    Try it in your bare feet after jogging a few laps lol. Like livewire said, it will naturally resolve itself sooner or later. You could try playing heel down for better control over your pedals and feet, that would help for a jazzier style. If you like the power you get from heel up then don't change it.
    what do you mean ,,heel down?

  5. #5

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    Some musicians like Thomas Lang and Dave Weckl prefer to keep their entire foot on the footboard rather than just their toes. Doing so increases how much control you have over speed and placement, but with the sacrifice of power. Once you get good at it I imagine you would develop that lost power like those artists had, but it's kinda tough to get used to.
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  6. #6

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    when I first started I kept just my toes on there and got plenty of power but niticed after a short time my calf would start to ache so after that i started placing my entire foot on it ,just about half way up..control doesnt seem to be as good but leg seems to hold out longer

  7. #7

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    That's usually a good approach, especially after you start learning some more complex bass beats. Personally, I think that going totally heel down hurts the calves more than anything. I guess it all just comes back to that legendary cliche, "No pain, no gain." lol
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  8. #8

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    Aunkster, there is also an item called a "toe stop" that can be attached to some bass pedals. If there is a small screw hole at the toe end of the pedal, it would accept a toe stop. This might help until you feel more control. Here's what the toe stop looks like:

    http://www.musiciansfriend.com/produ...per?sku=447514

    Otherwise, you've already gotten some very sound advice from LW and 32HB.
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by 32ndHeartBeat View Post
    That's usually a good approach, especially after you start learning some more complex bass beats. Personally, I think that going totally heel down hurts the calves more than anything. I guess it all just comes back to that legendary cliche, "No pain, no gain." lol
    I agree. I always found it more difficult to play heel down than heel up. When I play heel up though, the ball of my foot rests about 2/3 of the way up the footboard. You start to lose control of the pedal when your foot slides down, but it's almost impossible not to do that at fast tempos. When I play faster tempos (for me, fast is about 180-200) the ball of my foot slides down to about half-way or a little less. It's easier to bounce the pedals there, but it's harder to control them. When it gets to that point, a lot of your control depends on ankle strength.

    Aunkster, try moving your kick drum a little further away from you or move your throne back slightly. That can help with keeping yourself more balanced behind the kit. If you're playing and your feet are right below your knees, you're probably too close. Other than that, it's just a matter of time and getting used to it like everyone else said.

    Hope this helped!
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  10. #10

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    I know this is an old thread but I am looking to buy a new bass pedal and googled toe stop and this thread came up. When I bought my first kit years ago I got 3 free lessons with it. 2 things the teacher started me on was playing heel down and playing with the wrists not the arms. To this day I play heel down and get plenty of power and find I can move my ankle faster than my whole leg. True you can get much more velocity out of heel up you just can't get with heel down. I'm the opposite I find it hard to play heel up with very much control, and only do heel up on occasion when I need that extra velocity for a note or 2 like when extra accent is need in combination with a crash. But even playing heel down at a fast heavy beat my foot slides up the pedal. Seems like allot of pedals don't have toe stops which is why I was looking them up. Maybe you guys that play heel up have your thrones raised higher for better control compared to having your throne a little lower for heel down.

  11. #11

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    Default Re: Bass drum Kick pedal

    It`s been a long time gone, but some lesser quality pedels, (ie good OLD "Speed King"
    some Yamaha, & some off brands have that valuable Toe Stop. You`1ll never foget UR
    First & full on TOE JAM!!! SLAMMING UR foot full on into the connecting strap or chain!!!!
    But... Thats where technique is learned early on. Heel up, Toe forward, "Power Hits".
    Heel up, Toe back, softer, controled, & RAPID hits! I played, no shoe, 4 yrs. Till I got tired of TOE BLEEDS! Practice w/ head down, focas on foot location & placement.
    "FEEL" UR equment. "KNOW" UR kit. "Let The Force Be With You!!!" BLA! BLA! BLA! LOL

  12. #12

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    Default Re: Bass drum Kick pedal

    Well I guess no matter how you play your bass I don't see why manufacturers are not including toe stops, I don't see any advantage to not having it. Most of the big guys with their mid range down make it an option you have to go find to buy. I think it would be better to charge an extra $2 or $3 dollars for the pedal with a toe stop and if for what ever reason a drummer prefers to not to use a toe stop they could just take it off.

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