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Thread: Playing bad on someone else's drum kit

  1. #1

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    Default Playing bad on someone else's drum kit

    This is a problem i always had in the past. I play good on my own set then when im at a friends house or at a gig and someone lets me play there set, i just dont sound the same.
    The tension on the bass drum is different, the toms are tilted differently ect....
    When you guys are forced to use someone elses kit, how do you do it? Its a silly question but what the heck.

  2. #2

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    Default Re: Playing bad on someone else's drum kit

    The more you do it, the easier it gets. Accept that you're probably not going to play as well on an unfamiliar kit. The less you worry, the smoother things will go.
    Mmm... Saturns.

  3. #3

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    It's not a silly question, and weezy is right. The more you do it, the easier it gets. When I was in college studying music (back in the 1800's), one instructor would have us play drumset pieces on the kit that was set up in the front of the class. But he wouldn't let us switch it around. We had to play it 'as is'.

    Set your kit up in an odd way and just make yourself play it that way now and then. It's part of a good, diversified practice program.
    - Tom

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  4. #4

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    Default Re: Playing bad on someone else's drum kit

    Great points as usual guys. The biggest issue i have on an unfamiliar set is always the bass drum pedal.
    Its impossible for me to get in fast kicks on another persons set.

  5. #5

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    We just do the best we can.
    -Brian

    "Too many crappy used drum stuff to list"

    Play the SONG......not the DRUMS!!!

    "I think that feeling is a lot more important than technique. It's all very well doing a triple paradiddle - but who's going to know you've done it? If you play technically you sound like everybody else. It's being original that counts." ~ John Bonham

  6. #6

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    It's not so much the time, but the cymbals. Sometimes it feels like the cymbals are a mile away and a foot above me.
    Quote Originally Posted by rickthedrummer View Post
    There is intelligent life out there. The problem is that there isn't any here.

    -Mike

  7. #7

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    Unless the drums are set up in a really ridiculous way, you should be able to play them. As for the pedal, bring your own. Mike, get longer drumsticks.

    You play the drums or they will play you. A good drummer can and will play on a chair with 2 spoons if he/she has to.

  8. #8

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    Yeah when I know I am going to play someone elses kit I always bring my own pedal, my old instructor had the weirdest spring/beater position on his pedal and it was all I could do t play a steady basic rock beat on it. Usually I can adapt to drum and cymbal positions.
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  9. #9

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    Naw man. Shouldn't matter. If you can play, you can play. Blaming other things gets you nothing.

  10. #10

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    When I was going to school for music this actually was a topic of discussion and turned into a lesson.

    As a musician you need to learn to adapt to not only your surroundings but your instrument too.
    You won't always be able to play your own gear but you need to be able to make anything and everything work.

    Our teacher started messing with us and daily setup the kit in horrible ways and made us play on it the way it sat.
    You have to adapt your fills to what you can do on what you're given.
    19pc Yamaha Maple Custom Vintage | 12pc PDP X7 | 9pc Ludwig Jr. | 8pc Pork Pie ZebraWood | 6pc Sonor | 5pc Orbitone |4pc Sonor Martini | 5pc Gretsch Energy | 41 Snare drums and growing!

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by drummer View Post
    It's not a silly question, and weezy is right. The more you do it, the easier it gets. When I was in college studying music (back in the 1800's), one instructor would have us play drumset pieces on the kit that was set up in the front of the class. But he wouldn't let us switch it around. We had to play it 'as is'.

    Set your kit up in an odd way and just make yourself play it that way now and then. It's part of a good, diversified practice program.
    Quote Originally Posted by SpazApproved View Post
    When I was going to school for music this actually was a topic of discussion and turned into a lesson.

    As a musician you need to learn to adapt to not only your surroundings but your instrument too.
    You won't always be able to play your own gear but you need to be able to make anything and everything work.

    Our teacher started messing with us and daily setup the kit in horrible ways and made us play on it the way it sat.
    You have to adapt your fills to what you can do on what you're given.
    I went through the same process....................and all my school friends that were performance majors in piano, brass, winds, and strings never had to adjust to such awkwardness.
    Gretsch USA & Zildjian
    (What Else Would I Ever Need ?)


  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricardo View Post
    I went through the same process....................and all my school friends that were performance majors in piano, brass, winds, and strings never had to adjust to such awkwardness.
    Yeah, but they can't play drums!!!

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickthedrummer View Post
    Yeah, but they can't play drums!!!
    Oh, no..................they weren't near that cool ! [except for one pianist]
    Gretsch USA & Zildjian
    (What Else Would I Ever Need ?)


  14. #14

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    Great advice given and I'll add my 2 cents. Besides the obvious hardware issues that can be remedied by bringing your own pedal, try setting up your kit in different configurations during the course of practice. As mentioned by those who had formal music instruction, it's almost a must to adapt to a different feel your instrument if you are asked to play one that's not your own.

    Just for the fun of it, try playing your kit blindfolded and only rely on memory and "feel". I often close my eyes when trying to tackle a complicated groove. The brain can go into the "overload" mode and by simply shutting down the visual aspect of playing can relax your muscles and you'll notice a calming feeling transcend down to your limbs.

  15. #15

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    I'm playing at a charity gig tonight with multiple other bands and provided, backline drums: told to bring my own cymbals, throne, snare and pedal. Last time i did this the kit looked like a kid's kit! I hope tonight's kit is a bit more "standard." Another time the kit was more standard but the two mounted toms actually rested their batter side hoops on the kick (mounts were broken they said.)
    SONOR 6 pc Special Edition 3007's red maple, old Pearl Brass 14x6 FF snare, Yamaha Tour Custom maple 8 pc., Tama 4 pc., honey amber B/B, Ludwig Supralite chrome 14x6.5 steel snare, Paiste, Saluda & Zildjian
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ricardo View Post
    Oh, no..................they weren't near that cool ! [except for one pianist]
    A piano is percussion, that's he/she is/was cool.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by late8 View Post
    Great advice given and I'll add my 2 cents. Besides the obvious hardware issues that can be remedied by bringing your own pedal, try setting up your kit in different configurations during the course of practice. As mentioned by those who had formal music instruction, it's almost a must to adapt to a different feel your instrument if you are asked to play one that's not your own.

    Just for the fun of it, try playing your kit blindfolded and only rely on memory and "feel". I often close my eyes when trying to tackle a complicated groove. The brain can go into the "overload" mode and by simply shutting down the visual aspect of playing can relax your muscles and you'll notice a calming feeling transcend down to your limbs.
    Well...look what the cat drug in! I had to look twice at the post. Good to see & hear from you again!
    -Brian

    "Too many crappy used drum stuff to list"

    Play the SONG......not the DRUMS!!!

    "I think that feeling is a lot more important than technique. It's all very well doing a triple paradiddle - but who's going to know you've done it? If you play technically you sound like everybody else. It's being original that counts." ~ John Bonham

  18. #18

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    So last night I played a 20-10-14 tama provided for the event( small tom on a snare stand-not what I like) using my Speed King pedal, Sabian cheap cymbals....but the kick slid out 6" during every song and I'd drag it back during some songs beating the FT to keep time! This is a good reason for mounted toms whose weight would've stopped the crawl. The kick spurs were out, the rug was good but to no avail. I wished for a rope but we were in hurry mode: do the short set list and get out for the next band. Sigh.
    SONOR 6 pc Special Edition 3007's red maple, old Pearl Brass 14x6 FF snare, Yamaha Tour Custom maple 8 pc., Tama 4 pc., honey amber B/B, Ludwig Supralite chrome 14x6.5 steel snare, Paiste, Saluda & Zildjian
    Loaned out Slingerland upgraded 4 pc 1963 black, wrapped maple + 14" Pearl birch FT
    The Almighty Speed King pedal, Speed Cobra, Sonor Single

    http://www.screaminmelinas.com

  19. #19

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    when i gotta do it i'll break something before i'm done just to let them know it sucked.
    RED DIRT MOUNTAIN
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