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Thread: Buliding drum solo's

  1. #1

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    Default Buliding drum solo's

    Hi all

    is there a thread on how to put a drum solo together? or does anyone have any advice on drum soloing.

    Cheers Mark
    Have you got you're ticket for the rock train? You gotta earn that Ticket!!

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  2. #2

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    I say just feel it out. Watch Buddy Rich to kind of see how he does it.

  3. #3

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    The actual solo part is not the hard part for me, it is the coming out of it and joining back up with the main groove. I guess it takes practice. As far as building the solo itself, it is about the feel of the song for sure. But, a good place to start though is working different rudiments around the kit. You see that a lot with many of the big drummers.
    ---- If thine enemy wrong thee, buy each of his children a drum. - chinese proverb

  4. #4

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    Neil Peart - Anatomy of a Drum Solo?
    - Zack

  5. #5

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    Building solos is no mystery. As with anything else, you need to have some basic raw material to work with. For us, that would be patterns around the drum set...including cymbals and accessory items we might have. What many seem not to consider is that it is easier to build a solo into an existing phrase. The most basic solo is a single measure drum fill. Play a 4 measure groove ( 1234 | 2234 | 3234 | 4234 ) and fill the 4th with pattern that will take you back into your groove. It can be anything even as simple as 4 quarter note beats on a drum or drums. By starting here, you can then begin to vary your patterns and changing the rhythm into 8th notes, 16th notes, snare/kixk combo patterns etc. etc. Once you become comfortable with the 4 measure phrase, you can then begin to increase your solo patterns into longer and longer phrases. Eventually, coming up with extended solos is no longer a problem. Why? Because along the way, you amass a "Vocabulary" of drum patters you either made yourself or you have gleaned from others. The possibilities are unlimited. Drums are a musical instrument and have to be played as such. The music we play, jazz, rock, contry, is all structured within strict guidelines of composition and theory. Chords are not just random, they have to change within an existing key pattern. Whether you agree or not, our job as drummers is to LISTEN to those chord changes and play our part accordingly so that the band can feel strong and confident in you. If this were as easy as simply playing a beat, how many of us would do only that?You must remember that every solo artist you ever heard played drums crafted that solo to begin with...e.g. Neil Peart "Anatomy Of A Drum Solo." So, what I would suggest is, start listening to whatever you like to play along to and discover what I've been saying here. You'll be amazed at the difference in perspective you will now have
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  6. #6

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    Great post fia

  7. #7

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    What I ALWAYS do is base it on emotion. Don't play angry if you are not. I always start with the groove and some quick soloing then I leave the groove except for the hi-hat and bass and I solo. When I feel the time is right I change volume, speed, etc. I also work on melodies with the cymbals.

  8. #8

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    Soloing is hard if you are not in the mood, being put on the spot can sometimes make it difficult, I do my best soloing when I just pop into it as the feeling comes to me (mostly when I am practicing). I like doing solos in songs, when the band steps aside and lets me set the tempo and start a grove then the bass player steps in and we play of each other, then the band comes in as we build it up and then back into the original grove and end the song. To just come out and do a demonstration solo in a set is not my style and is not comfortable, so if you are having trouble with solos, start by having a breakdown in a song, one you feel is suited for your style and build a solo from there.

    KM
    http://www.myspace.com/thebanters

    I'm still the best Keith Moon type drummer in the world
    My friends call me Keith, but you can call me John.
    - Keith Moon-

  9. #9

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    I am defineley not an expert or anything and there are plenty of other people here to give better advice. But as for me I kinda like to set a pulse with my high hat. then start by doing some rudimental work around the toms and slowly start bringing the snare in more and more. Then slowly start to hit more acssosries such as cymbals and stuff like that. until eventually I have the double pedal going and am using everything at my disposble. But again that is just how I go about approaching soloing, but honestly I am really not a fan of soloing. I'd rather just do a fill in a song then just solo but again that is my opioion( wow I can't spell).

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by fiacovaz View Post
    Building solos is no mystery. As with anything else, you need to have some basic raw material to work with. For us, that would be patterns around the drum set...including cymbals and accessory items we might have. What many seem not to consider is that it is easier to build a solo into an existing phrase. The most basic solo is a single measure drum fill. Play a 4 measure groove ( 1234 | 2234 | 3234 | 4234 ) and fill the 4th with pattern that will take you back into your groove. It can be anything even as simple as 4 quarter note beats on a drum or drums. By starting here, you can then begin to vary your patterns and changing the rhythm into 8th notes, 16th notes, snare/kixk combo patterns etc. etc. Once you become comfortable with the 4 measure phrase, you can then begin to increase your solo patterns into longer and longer phrases. Eventually, coming up with extended solos is no longer a problem. Why? Because along the way, you amass a "Vocabulary" of drum patters you either made yourself or you have gleaned from others. The possibilities are unlimited. Drums are a musical instrument and have to be played as such. The music we play, jazz, rock, contry, is all structured within strict guidelines of composition and theory. Chords are not just random, they have to change within an existing key pattern. Whether you agree or not, our job as drummers is to LISTEN to those chord changes and play our part accordingly so that the band can feel strong and confident in you. If this were as easy as simply playing a beat, how many of us would do only that?You must remember that every solo artist you ever heard played drums crafted that solo to begin with...e.g. Neil Peart "Anatomy Of A Drum Solo." So, what I would suggest is, start listening to whatever you like to play along to and discover what I've been saying here. You'll be amazed at the difference in perspective you will now have
    Nice post.

    I rarely do drum solo's when playing live, I much prefer to play as part of a band.
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  11. #11

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    I hate doing solo's, I can't do them for my life. But I guess the crowd likes them. One gig they made me do 4 of them... idk why but they kept asking for another drum solo.

  12. #12

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    The only time I had a request for a drum solo was when I was a teenager and played in a cover band in a beach town (northern Cal) and they wanted wipeout, so I gave them wipeout with my 9 piece double base kit, later that week some of my friends said they could not believe I did wipeout with double base, I did not remember the solo at all, off on another planet when playing.

    KM
    http://www.myspace.com/thebanters

    I'm still the best Keith Moon type drummer in the world
    My friends call me Keith, but you can call me John.
    - Keith Moon-

  13. #13

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    Default Re: Buliding drum solo's

    Quote Originally Posted by fiacovaz View Post
    Building solos is no mystery. As with anything else, you need to have some basic raw material to work with. For us, that would be patterns around the drum set...including cymbals and accessory items we might have. What many seem not to consider is that it is easier to build a solo into an existing phrase. The most basic solo is a single measure drum fill. Play a 4 measure groove ( 1234 | 2234 | 3234 | 4234 ) and fill the 4th with pattern that will take you back into your groove. It can be anything even as simple as 4 quarter note beats on a drum or drums. By starting here, you can then begin to vary your patterns and changing the rhythm into 8th notes, 16th notes, snare/kixk combo patterns etc. etc. Once you become comfortable with the 4 measure phrase, you can then begin to increase your solo patterns into longer and longer phrases. Eventually, coming up with extended solos is no longer a problem. Why? Because along the way, you amass a "Vocabulary" of drum patters you either made yourself or you have gleaned from others. The possibilities are unlimited. Drums are a musical instrument and have to be played as such. The music we play, jazz, rock, contry, is all structured within strict guidelines of composition and theory. Chords are not just random, they have to change within an existing key pattern. Whether you agree or not, our job as drummers is to LISTEN to those chord changes and play our part accordingly so that the band can feel strong and confident in you. If this were as easy as simply playing a beat, how many of us would do only that?You must remember that every solo artist you ever heard played drums crafted that solo to begin with...e.g. Neil Peart "Anatomy Of A Drum Solo." So, what I would suggest is, start listening to whatever you like to play along to and discover what I've been saying here. You'll be amazed at the difference in perspective you will now have
    As usual, Frank, you gave a well thought out and complete response filled with insights that can take anyone a long way. Following your advice might not be the easiest way to go, but your advice will lead to an understanding of an instrument, and it's interaction with the other musicians - making the drummer a more complete musician in the process.
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  14. #14

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    I am the drummer of two bands, and struggle to differentiate my drum fills/solo's. Any help ?

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