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Thread: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

  1. #1

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    Default What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Hello, I am new to drumming and this forum, and heard this term today. Someone in a drum discussion on another forum mentioned developing a deep pocket. Can someone tell me what this means?

  2. #2

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Deep pockets= Having lots of money $$$. Reaching "down" into your pockets to find a wad of cash.

  3. #3

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    Ha! I could be wrong, but the way the question was worded it sounded like the discussion was more about developing a skill. I am sure a little extra money wouldn't hurt though.

  4. #4

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Google "deep pocket" drum definition.
    Much has been said on the subject, others define it much better than I can, but to me it means creating a solid foundation within the song so that others can solo and know right where the groove is.

  5. #5

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    Just listen to and imitate Steve Gadd and you will have the perfect definition and reputation of having a "deep pocket" in terms of groove! It really isn't as simple as it sounds but in reality that is what it is....

  6. #6

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Lol...nah, Late8's having a joke at your expense I'm afraid. Groove, pocket...deep pocket, these terms can vary in explanation from player to player. But essentially it means to be able to hold a rhythm without too much flash....maybe a few subtle variations here and there, such as a slight opening of the hi-hat making a lil' sizzling sound, an extra note here and there on the kick drum to push the groove together with the bass player. Again, what to keep in mind is what to play (or more importantly, what not to overplay) within the style that you play. If I was playing with a blues band, and the guitarist wants the rhythm to play a little deeper, I'd make the kick land on the beat, but the snare a little lazier, feeling it a bit behind the backbeat of "2&4".

    It's not something that can be explained by notation, it comes by playing it over time, and a lot of listening. Latin and reggae are another couple of styles that require a laidback feel.....if you took a simple reggae groove like that in say Bob Marley's "No Woman, No Cry", technically it's simple....a simple hi-hat rhythm, with the rimshot/rimclick on the snare together with the kick drum on 3 (classic reggae one-drop). But it's the feel that can be elusive....I know because I see the same mistakes my students do with this song that I did myself two decades ago when trying to get reggae. Funk is another ballgame altogether....you can do all the fancy kick variations, offbeat snare accents and so forth, but if you don't come back on the one...well, you're not playing it, especially with a bassist.

    Check this out:

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cww04Ajpgxs"]YouTube - Flashlight - Scofield, Grainger, Chambers[/ame]

    Some snippets from Rock School on YouTube....see if you can watch all eight installments on Funk!

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HvPxNW7iyY"]YouTube - Rock School Vol 3 - Part 1 of 8 - How To Play Funk[/ame]

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mEwH9-_XxM"]YouTube - Rock School Vol 3 - Part 3 of 8 - Funk & Reggae Bass[/ame]

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfJ2Xn2IABQ"]YouTube - Rock School Vol 3 - Part 4 of 8 - Reggae Drums & Bass[/ame]
    Last edited by Drumbledore; 01-03-2011 at 05:38 PM.
    "...it's the Paradigm Of The Cosmos!" Stewart Copeland on Youtube

    668: The Number Of The Guy Next Door To The Beast.

    "A random act of kindness; it keeps my heart in shape!" - Late8

  7. #7

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Playing for the song, not on the song?
    Listen to some john bonham, he is infamous for playing in the pocket.

    as ducfoot says there is so many alternate definitions, have a research. Or ask your drum teacher if you have one, i guess it is easier to be shown than to be told, i was quite clueless about it until i properly heard it and tried it out for myself.

  8. #8

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Phil Rudd from AC/DC plays deep in the pocket .
    Tamaholic

  9. #9

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    I learned something new today, never heard the term related to anything besides money.

  10. #10

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    Its a good question, as its one of those words, tossed around, like 'groove'. I agree with many above but its a term best put to music - check out Phil Rudd (on Back in Black), John Bonham (Lemon Song, during the bass solo), Steve Jordan (I Don't Need no Doctor), or any Bernard Purdie (the most recorded drummer) ... great example of hanging 'deep in the pocket'. My favorite saying about thsi subject is by Steve Jordan who says, when making a groove, 'simple' doesn't mean 'stupid'.

  11. #11

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    Excellent! Thanks for all the well thought responses.

  12. #12

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by atomcorr2 View Post
    Phil Rudd from AC/DC plays deep in the pocket .
    Took the words right outta my mouth atomcorr. Phil exemplifies the term.

    sk
    "A man can NEVER have too many cymbals"

    Proudly Playing

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    Paiste Twenty/2002/Signature Cymbals
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  13. #13

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Wow, that Rock School is great! I've never heard of it before. Thanks for posting, Drumbledore.

  14. #14

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    I think ZZ Tops Frank Beard is about the best definition of a deep pocket drummer. The drummer is almost metronomic yet the music is easy flowing over the groove.

    Personally I think Rush and Led Zeppelin are examples of Un-deep pocket. The music is always being more less interupted in it's flow, by virtue of its own virtuosity. That is not an indictment of their ablity. I would say that symphony orchestras are not deep pocket groovers either. Noting to do with musical abilty. I would desribe most prog rock as "angular" in form as opposed to pocket. By this I means it spikes a lot in its intensity.

    all the best...

  15. #15

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbledore View Post
    Lol...nah, Late8's having a joke at your expense I'm afraid. Groove, pocket...deep pocket, these terms can vary in explanation from player to player. But essentially it means to be able to hold a rhythm without too much flash....maybe a few subtle variations here and there, such as a slight opening of the hi-hat making a lil' sizzling sound, an extra note here and there on the kick drum to push the groove together with the bass player. Again, what to keep in mind is what to play (or more importantly, what not to overplay) within the style that you play. If I was playing with a blues band, and the guitarist wants the rhythm to play a little deeper, I'd make the kick land on the beat, but the snare a little lazier, feeling it a bit behind the backbeat of "2&4".

    It's not something that can be explained by notation, it comes by playing it over time, and a lot of listening. Latin and reggae are another couple of styles that require a laidback feel.....if you took a simple reggae groove like that in say Bob Marley's "No Woman, No Cry", technically it's simple....a simple hi-hat rhythm, with the rimshot/rimclick on the snare together with the kick drum on 3 (classic reggae one-drop). But it's the feel that can be elusive....I know because I see the same mistakes my students do with this song that I did myself two decades ago when trying to get reggae. Funk is another ballgame altogether....you can do all the fancy kick variations, offbeat snare accents and so forth, but if you don't come back on the one...well, you're not playing it, especially with a bassist.

    Check this out:

    YouTube - Flashlight - Scofield, Grainger, Chambers

    Some snippets from Rock School on YouTube....see if you can watch all eight installments on Funk!

    YouTube - Rock School Vol 3 - Part 1 of 8 - How To Play Funk

    YouTube - Rock School Vol 3 - Part 3 of 8 - Funk & Reggae Bass

    YouTube - Rock School Vol 3 - Part 4 of 8 - Reggae Drums & Bass
    Drumbledore, thanks for sharing it. Perfect for us drummers that want to expand our vocabularies to a variety of grooves.

    Jojo

  16. #16

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by mainedrummah View Post
    Wow, that Rock School is great! I've never heard of it before. Thanks for posting, Drumbledore.
    No probs, someone's posted a ton of those shows on YouTube...I got to hear of it through some friends of mine who raved on about seeing it back in the 80's, but never got to see the shows until Youtube came about.
    "...it's the Paradigm Of The Cosmos!" Stewart Copeland on Youtube

    668: The Number Of The Guy Next Door To The Beast.

    "A random act of kindness; it keeps my heart in shape!" - Late8

  17. #17

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    Default Re: What does the term "deep pocket" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by kay-gee View Post
    I think ZZ Tops Frank Beard is about the best definition of a deep pocket drummer. The drummer is almost metronomic yet the music is easy flowing over the groove.

    Personally I think Rush and Led Zeppelin are examples of Un-deep pocket. The music is always being more less interupted in it's flow, by virtue of its own virtuosity. That is not an indictment of their ablity. I would say that symphony orchestras are not deep pocket groovers either. Noting to do with musical abilty. I would desribe most prog rock as "angular" in form as opposed to pocket. By this I means it spikes a lot in its intensity.

    all the best...
    I overlooked Frank kay-gee. Another good example.
    "A man can NEVER have too many cymbals"

    Proudly Playing

    Sonor Force 3007 Stage One Piano Black 22X17.5 kick, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14 and 16" toms
    Pork Pie Big Black Snare
    Vater Sticks/Brushes
    Remo Vintage Emperor, Emperor X, and Powerstroke Pro Heads
    Paiste Twenty/2002/Signature Cymbals
    Sonor/DW/Gibraltar Hardware

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