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Thread: Got WOOD?!

  1. #1

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    Default Got WOOD?!

    Got your attention? :P Just wondering who likes what wood. And who knows about different woods and ply thicknesses and how that affects the sound of the wood. Like i heard that maple gives lots of deepend and overall more warm sound. But that could just be because of its ply thickness too. And the depth and width of the drum too. Obviously the width changes the tone of the sound. Whats the depth do?

    Anyone know anything about these?

  2. #2

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    Got my attention! LMAO!

  3. #3

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    i knew someone would fall for it! :P ya dont know though do ya? :S

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stevo42w
    i knew someone would fall for it! :P ya dont know though do ya? :S
    No, sorry, I'm still a newbie to all of this drumming stuff but I'm pretty sure BTG is very knowledgeable on this subject, he should be on later and I'm sure he'll answer your post..........

  5. #5

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    From the Drum Tuning Bible: "Maple compared to African Mahogany: Mahogany will have an approximate 20% increase in low frequency resonance over the Maple drum, mid and high frequencies will be the same from a reproduction point of view. Maple compared to Birch: Birch will have about a 10% loss in reproduction of low end compared to Maple and about a 20% increase in the high end, with the mid range remaining about the same. So the Birch kit will definitely be a "harder" and "brighter" sounding kit. Beech is in
    between Maple and Birch. All other Maple colored woods used in laminated shells are basically there for either structural integrity or looks and do not have the desired qualities (meaning density and grain structure) of the above.

    "The shell depth while having an impact on the warmth or resonance of the drum has a greater impact on volume and articulation. The diameter has a far greater impact on creating lower pitch. Greater depth increases volume or power by having an impact on resonance of the fundamental note of the shell. A shallower shell creates a shorter burst of tone and makes a drum more articulate by virtue of the fact that the quantity of surface area of the parent material (i.e. the shell) is lessened and therefore cannot resonate as much as large surface area. Less distance between heads means the opposite head (i.e. Resonant head) reacts quicker, or gets excited faster when striking the batter head, it responds better to softer playing. For instance, a 22" diameter kick drum of 16" in depth has a shell area of approximately 1,106 square inches. A 22" diameter kick drum of 18" in depth has a shell area of approximately 1,244 square inches, or a 12.5% increase in area to resonate. Take that same thought to a 10" tom with a 9" depth. This results in a shell area of approximately 282 square inches versus one with an 11" depth, which results in a shell area of 346 sq. in. That 2" increase in depth is now a 22% gain. The deeper the shell, the more likely they are to produce a deeper or warmer sound because of resonance ability, but this should not be confused with a low tuning."

  6. #6

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    ??

  7. #7

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    what's not to understand?

  8. #8

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    All those nubers kinda scared me.

  9. #9

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    lol thats all pretty styraight forward. Cheers. Its pretty much a comprimise between sound and volume. Thats easy enough. Resonance is all about air space. So more you give it. More it resonates :> I get it. And maple does sound like the wood of choise. Good all rounder kinda thing.

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