Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Relaxation exercises

  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Default Relaxation exercises

    Hey guys, I find that when playing at home on the ekit I don't experience any muscle strain. When rehearsing with the guys I end up with slight strain up my right forearm and last night ended up with tingles in my left thumb. I know it's from tensing up and when I realize I am doing it I relax and everything feels smoother. Unfortunately I tense up more than relax.

    Is it sticks? Is it warm up or are than any relaxation exercises that can help with this? And no I don't mean yoga haha
    I play, Gretsch Catalina Birch, 7 piece in the vintage sunburst finish.


    RIP, Frank. You will not be forgotten. Missing you, mate

  2. #2

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Relaxation exercises

    I think you're forcing the issue: the kit is as loud as you dial it up to be but acoustic drums depend on hit of the sticks. Could be you are accustomed to the louder sound in your headphones and when switching to real drums you have to force them to be louder, so you hit harder and this stresses your grip, causing the pain later on. I don't think there is a relaxation technique but rather an approach to the acoustic drums that should be changed.

  3. #3

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Relaxation exercises

    Quote Originally Posted by slinglander View Post
    I think you're forcing the issue: the kit is as loud as you dial it up to be but acoustic drums depend on hit of the sticks. Could be you are accustomed to the louder sound in your headphones and when switching to real drums you have to force them to be louder, so you hit harder and this stresses your grip, causing the pain later on. I don't think there is a relaxation technique but rather an approach to the acoustic drums that should be changed.
    Makes sense about trying to achieve the same noise levels contributing to the strain. What approach to the acoustic kit are you suggesting?
    I play, Gretsch Catalina Birch, 7 piece in the vintage sunburst finish.


    RIP, Frank. You will not be forgotten. Missing you, mate

  4. #4

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Relaxation exercises

    I think that knowing the difference between the two kits you now know that there is no real need to hit as hard as you did- that the perception that you aren't playing loud enough is jut that, perception. I suppose you could dial back the kit volume, since you play it more often. When you play the acoustic kit you should notice how much louder it sounds, which may cause you to not bang as hard as you have been.

  5. #5

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Relaxation exercises

    Like Slinglander said, and I find that a ****tail before band practice helps. lol

  6. #6

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Relaxation exercises

    its the ekit dude. half the effort physically to acquire the same sound acoustically.
    they are magic

  7. #7

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Relaxation exercises

    Yup, take it from me, an acoustic set and an electronic one are two different beasts, takes a little while to switch from the feel and sound perception of one going to the other. I'm kind of lucky in that the Alesis SURGE cymbals feel way more realistic, because after all, you're still hitting a metal surface (in this case, brass, with a clear acrylic disc which 'muffles' the vibration acoustically, so that the trigger underneath can give you the sound electronically). Still, even though my snare pads on both sets give me the snare and cross-stick sounds that I like using, the feel is a liitle different. But I can live with it. I used to use (and still have) an old Remo 'tunable' practice pad set (which I did some modifications on) and had plastic practice cymbals on it.....got used to switching from that to a real set for band practices and gigs. Never had any problems.

    Maybe do what I do before you play on an acoustic set....break out a practice pad, stretch your wrists and fingers, give yourself 5-10 mins of working on your strokes and combinations.....singles, doubles, flams etc. Accented and unaccented triplets are always good and simple for working your hands up....some hand drummers do that. Sometimes I practice darbuka patterns with my fingers on the pad, doing rolls and trills and the usual 'doum, tek-tek, doum tek' patterns I learned when I took percussion lessons. Hand drumming for me, particularly Middle Eastern and now the Indian tabla strokes that I've been learning bit by bit warms my fingers up brilliantly. Congas are a bit hard on hands however, unless I've been keeping up with it during the week, most hand drummers will tell you that though.
    "...it's the Paradigm Of The Cosmos!" Stewart Copeland on Youtube

    668: The Number Of The Guy Next Door To The Beast.

    "A random act of kindness; it keeps my heart in shape!" - Late8

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •