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Thread: Tips on Cymbal Care

  1. #26

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    Default Re: Tips on Cymbal Care

    Quote Originally Posted by drummer View Post
    Much to do about nothing. I've been leaning cymbals, stacking cymbals all different ways, not using cloths inbetween them, etc. for years. Cymbals are solid metal and they can take a lot of abuse with little to no worries.
    Too right. I take care of them, especially the few that are almost like museum pieces, such as my Turkish made 20" K Zildjian ride, my two 1960's Paiste 602's (a 15" Ride/Crash and a 22" Sizzle Ride), my 1970's Black Label 2002 Paistes (22" Crash & 20" Medium) and my Paiste 2000 Sound Reflections Set (20" Ride, 18" & 16" Crashes plus a non-Reflections 14" Heavy Hi-Hats) stored in a separate cymbal case.....I have probably a four or five cymbal cases for the vast majority of those cymbals and a separate bag for just storing splashes, bells, cup chimes and all sorts of small cymbals, but man, I don't need to look after them like newborn puppies, lol. They get a once-a-year clean (although some more than others if I'm using them frequently) and that's about it, if I'm lucky to have time to do it.
    "...it's the Paradigm Of The Cosmos!" Stewart Copeland on Youtube

    668: The Number Of The Guy Next Door To The Beast.

    "A random act of kindness; it keeps my heart in shape!" - Late8

  2. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbledore View Post
    Too right. I take care of them, especially the few that are almost like museum pieces, such as my Turkish made 20" K Zildjian ride, my two 1960's Paiste 602's (a 15" Ride/Crash and a 22" Sizzle Ride), my 1970's Black Label 2002 Paistes (22" Crash & 20" Medium) and my Paiste 2000 Sound Reflections Set (20" Ride, 18" & 16" Crashes plus a non-Reflections 14" Heavy Hi-Hats) stored in a separate cymbal case.....I have probably a four or five cymbal cases for the vast majority of those cymbals and a separate bag for just storing splashes, bells, cup chimes and all sorts of small cymbals, but man, I don't need to look after them like newborn puppies, lol. They get a once-a-year clean (although some more than others if I'm using them frequently) and that's about it, if I'm lucky to have time to do it.
    I can relate to the museum pieces haha Although they may not be considered museum pieces to you, my two paiste rude crashes are probably the most important (and most expensive) part of my kit besides the actual drums. I take care of those two cymbals maybe too much, sort of like newly found puppies
    Happy Drumming!

    IS15

  3. #28

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    If anyone is intrested in knowing anything and everything about any cymbal this is the book to have.

    RED DIRT MOUNTAIN
    UFiP TAMAHA Zildjian REGAL TiP

  4. #29

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    Thanks for all the great tips!
    Quote Originally Posted by rickthedrummer View Post
    There is intelligent life out there. The problem is that there isn't any here.

    -Mike

  5. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by majesticmadman View Post
    Hey,
    So recently I bought a new kit, and well the skins weren't very good, so I'm looking at investing in some new ones.

    I play with a Pearl Vision Birch 8 piece kit. I'm looking at replacing both batter and resonance heads for a 10", 13" and 14" rack tom and 14" and 16" floor toms' as well as batter heads on two 22" bass drums.

    I tend to play music like Alice Cooper, twisted sister, Bon Jovi, Bryan Adams, MeatLoaf, rainbow, Bob seger, Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, Status quo.

    I quite like to go for a deeper tuning than a higher tuning, and I like to have about a second of sustain after the initial hit.

    I have preference for coated skins but if there is none that suit what I'm looking for I'm happy to go for uncoated. I was suggest to use remo pinstripes as batters and Remo Diplomats as Resonance heads.

    I'm looking for suggestion and I don't mind paying out for the heads.

    Edit: When I say recent I mean 'may'
    Does anyone remember a product called Drummers Cymbal Cleaner? It came as crystals that you mixed with water, then just wash your cymbal following the grooves. Then you
    rinsed it in the sink and dried it with a soft towel. They came out very clean and shiny. I used in the mid 1970s.

  6. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelanson View Post
    Does anyone remember a product called Drummers Cymbal Cleaner? It came as crystals that you mixed with water, then just wash your cymbal following the grooves. Then you
    rinsed it in the sink and dried it with a soft towel. They came out very clean and shiny. I used in the mid 1970s.
    Never heard of it.............but I didn't start drumming until the late 70's

  7. #32

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    I convinced myself that the risks of buying an expensive cymbal for my 14 year old were much diminished by also getting a grombal cymbal sleeve. Although he had demonstrated considerable talent and reasonable work ethic (ie.practice), he could not be trusted to keep ahold of felts and sleeves, wing nuts, etc. He was gigging already and I saw some horrible things visavis equipment care. Horrible, nightmarish things.

    Anyway, these grombals are very strong and make keyholing verrry unlikely. They also make attaching simple sizzlers very easy. There are two potential drawbacks -- one it takes away a slight amount of sustain, and two . . . well catastrophic failure could lead to your cymbal sliding violently down the stem (if that is what you call it) and that would certainly be bad. So it is smart to have a look at them frequently, though the one on the Kcon looks as new after three years. If you have a valuable cymbal that may receive less than kid gloves handling I would definitely recommend.
    Last edited by dadrum; 07-17-2016 at 07:12 PM.

  8. #33

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    I have Grombals on all my cymbals and they work just fine. I love 'em! I put a flat or even better a cone washer on first followed by a soft cushy felt washer on top, then the cymbal with the Grombal, topped off with the Tama plastic qiuck release cap! works great for me.

  9. #34

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    No harsh cleaners. I clean mine with lemons. Keep cymbals separated with a cloth between them when in a case or bag. Always, always, always use plastic sheaths on the cymbal stand post! Metal on metal vibration will cause cracks. When striking, raise the stick above keep it level to the cymbal. Always swing with a slight sideways or "glancing" motion. Striking the edge head on repeatedly will dramatically shorten a cymbals life. Buy cymbals with a traditional finish! Bright finish will absorb oil from finger prints that can't be removed without a professional clean and polish. When you do this it will remove the logos. That's about it.
    Last edited by SunDog; 07-23-2016 at 05:15 PM.

    Collectors Black Ice Finishply
    10x8,12x9,15x12,16x14,20x18,24x16
    14X6 Collectors 10 and 6 snare Natural Satin
    14x8 Collectors Black Nickel over Brass

  10. #35

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    Yeah...it's a little harsh. But extremely effective, LOL


    Before

    After
    -Brian

    "Too many crappy used drum stuff to list"

    Play the SONG......not the DRUMS!!!

    "I think that feeling is a lot more important than technique. It's all very well doing a triple paradiddle - but who's going to know you've done it? If you play technically you sound like everybody else. It's being original that counts." ~ John Bonham

  11. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Northern Redneck View Post
    You arent supposed to wail on splashes in the first place, and besides take an old splash put it on a proper cymbal stand with a normal lenght thread and try to get it to fly off while playing it.

    Cymbal tree. but since most of us cant afford nor have the room for one, Id say a hard case with the cymbals screwed tightly together, make sure the case is vented so moisture doesnt build up.

    Sabian Factory:
    Some one should tell Sabian they're damaging their cymbals edges!

  12. #37

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    I thought that was Bishs' spare room

  13. #38

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    I'm old, and rather 'old school'; I don't hold with cleaning cymbals at all, as there are few techniques that remove only gunk, without removing metal (especially the 'highs and lows' of the grooves, which give the 'tone' to the instrument, much like vinyl records. What..? You don't remember vinyl records..? ). I don't hold, either, with having dirty cymbals. How to square this circle..? I use Cymbags; a cloth sleeve which enables easy manipulation of the cymbal whilst never actually touching the metal. They're placed on their stands, and when I'm ready to play, I whip 'em off. As soon as the show is over, my first gestes are putting the Cymbags in place again. They're then ready to be packed away in their full flight case. I'm far from rich, and, even though mine are not pricey collector's items, they cost quite enough to bear looking after with simple precaution. It's not shiny cymbals that I'm after, it's musical cymbals. I play out much less these days (did I mention that I'm old..? ); I have had the same cymbal set for the last thirty-odd years, and they still have their factory glimmer, and no finger prints.
    Disclaimer: I have, of course, no connection with Cymbags other than as a very satisfied customer. A brilliant idea I wish I'd found much, much earlier, as it was a bit of a chore making and using the 'pillow-case' sleeves I had until I came across these.
    Have a nice day.
    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  14. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by imperialstar15 View Post
    You got me on the angle one, that is very true. The height of the cymbal can make any angle possible.

    If you lean a cymbal against a wall, they may not "warp" but the force of the weight of the cymbal on one little edge on the the cymbal itself, will cause damage to the edge over time.

    And a cymbal can be to loose where it will fly off your stand when you hit it
    Just revisiting this thread. Didn't reread the whole thing yet but couldn't resist commenting on this, my original thought on the first read, so I apologize if this has been fully parsed already.
    I don't believe any bronze alloys are fluidic. Your cymbal won't be damaged by its own weight by sitting on an edge, just like leaving it on a stand for four thousand years won't result in it drooping and flowing down the stand.
    It is probably best to store them flat but having your extras/out of current rotation pies leaning displayed somewhere is pretty hard to resist.
    Operative word: "pretty".

  15. #40

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    oops, I already made a snide-ish comment. I wallow in shame and self loathing.

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