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Thread: seeing your old band with a new drummer

  1. #1

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    Default seeing your old band with a new drummer

    I did this last night with Muckraker. Actually the former guitarist and me were there. I didn't know he was going to be there but it was cool that he was. It was pretty cool to all be together again and talk. We took a pic together which was fun. I asked Will where he found the new members and he just said it was a long story so i left it there.

    the new drummer was pretty good. He has a Blue Vistalight set, picture a Zep set in blue. 26" 14,16,18, no reso port on the kick, don't know what metal snare he had but it was loud and what I liked most were his cymbals! man they sounded good Paiste 2002's

    It's weird watching someone else kind of copy your playing off a disc they were given. Some of it was pretty close but he also added a lot of different kind of rolls at times where I didn't do them and the way he went into them was way different. At times it felt like there was a tad of a struggle for him to play some parts of the songs, some things were a little off which is totally understandable. I always disliked playing what someone else has already recorded and still do. But once they rack up more time playing together the timing and anything else should smooth out.

    Will gave me the new copy of the disc in a digipack form. Nothing different about it besides just being cardboard now. Well that's about it just thought I'd share my story.
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  2. #2

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    Slinky, I've been through this as well. My experience was a little different in that I heard the new guy and I thought "wow...what an upgrade!" Hahahaha. Yeah, he was a beast on our old material for sure. Completely different from the way I played the parts. He was all about the fills and I was all about the pocket. Both methods served the band well. I didn't have the skills that guy possessed, but it was all good. Anyway, there were cool vibes, no hard feelings, and I still talk with those guys to this day. Thanks for sharing your story!

  3. #3

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    The hardest part for me would be listening and not playing. Every time I hear a live band, my adrenaline starts pumping and I want to play. It's awesome that your still in touch with them.
    -Brian

    "Too many crappy used drum stuff to list"

    Play the SONG......not the DRUMS!!!

    "I think that feeling is a lot more important than technique. It's all very well doing a triple paradiddle - but who's going to know you've done it? If you play technically you sound like everybody else. It's being original that counts." ~ John Bonham

  4. #4

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    it was hard hearing a new drummer playing all my parts after I left my old main band. But I got over it and just lived to not worry. Was need to hear his approach though to some of my parts.
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  5. #5

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    I guess it's like seeing your old girlfriend with a new boyfriend. It depends on the terms of departure and the relationship.
    -Brian

    "Too many crappy used drum stuff to list"

    Play the SONG......not the DRUMS!!!

    "I think that feeling is a lot more important than technique. It's all very well doing a triple paradiddle - but who's going to know you've done it? If you play technically you sound like everybody else. It's being original that counts." ~ John Bonham

  6. #6

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    Yea I know what you mean . There is a local band that do mostly originals . I've known the couple for a very long time now , their son is now the front man and he's writing most of the stuff now . But when they record they call me and have me do all the drum parts . Live they use someone else . I went to see them play two weeks ago and the drummer they were using had no concept of "groove" or "song" . Just plowed through everything as if he was alone on stage ! The guy had chops...and he wanted the whole world to hear them LOL . It was sad really . I went up to say hello at the break and they were greeting a well respected bass player from here and the first thing he said was " Dose drummie have a groove !!? " . And they just rolled their eyes .
    Rudy .

  7. #7

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    Yeah always weird. I have seen 2 former bands with new drummers, the 1st was good but I feel I was better as his tempo was all over the place, but the 2nd one I saw was much better than me. My only criticize of him was he overplayed but it seemed to work well so probably just jealousy on my part LOL.

    Both times I talked to them and come to find out they were pretty cool guys. Like most of us are.
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  8. #8

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    Every band I was in broke up after I left.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wxmaggot View Post
    Slinky, I've been through this as well. My experience was a little different in that I heard the new guy and I thought "wow...what an upgrade!" Hahahaha. Yeah, he was a beast on our old material for sure. Completely different from the way I played the parts. He was all about the fills and I was all about the pocket. Both methods served the band well. I didn't have the skills that guy possessed, but it was all good. Anyway, there were cool vibes, no hard feelings, and I still talk with those guys to this day. Thanks for sharing your story!
    Yea I'm definately a pocket drummer too, my fills? well... hoping for the best is about right . It's interesting to see how different people play things. Everyones feel is different. I used the word struggle above, he wasn't struggling. Uncomfortable is probably a better way to put it, likely just a combination of playing something already recorded and limited rehearsal time. I don't think that lineup has been together too long yet.
    Last edited by slinky; 01-18-2016 at 06:13 AM.
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  10. #10

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    Being that the lion's share of the music I used to play in bands was country rock type stuff, there was only really one way to play the parts usually. Most of the bands only pick-up musicians that play that type of music when they need someone. It's really hard to play an Eagles song with a guitarist who wants to be the next Stevie Ray Vaughn or a drummer who wants to do the Neil Peart thing.

    all the best...

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by slinky View Post
    Yea I'm definately a pocket drummer too, my fills? well... hoping for the best is about right . It's interesting to see how different people play things. Everyones feel is different. I used the word struggle above, he wasn't struggling. Uncomfortable is probably a better way to put it, likely just a combination of playing something already recorded and limited rehearsal time. I don't think that lineup has been together too long yet.
    I agree that it's awesome seeing how musicians approach songs from such different perspectives. As I've gotten older, one thing I've realized is that the way we all interpret songs is unique. You find that out fast when jamming with other musicians. I've heard so many fellow drummers out at clubs say things like "he sucks cause he's just playing basic stuff" or "man that's easy I could do that". That kind of talk cracks me up. It's completely unfair. I didn't become a better drummer (relatively speaking) until I started playing in my second band, which played blues. When I was younger I always thought, like the others, "that stuff's easy". I learned quick that you are there to serve the song and that you have to learn to LISTEN to everyone around you. It's not as easy as some of those folks in the bar think!

  12. #12

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    Well said.

    I remember a guy at one of our jams. He got up during a break and played a fantastic drum solo. He had all these cool chops and was faster with one hand than I am with both. After the next set, he complemented me on and on about my playing. I was astonished that he would say that, given his skill level. I suggested he sit in on a few songs (Blues). He said he had only ever played thrash metal and didn't want to at first, but I encouraged him to give it a shot. The first song was a medium fast shuffle, and it was a complete train wreck. He was completely lost. I felt terrible for him and like a complete jerk myself......but I honestly never imagined that he would struggle with any song that I could ever play. I remember thinking; why doesn't he just listen to the bass line? Why did he try to stick a fill in there...its standard 12bar Blues, couldn't he hear where the chord progression was going? I still feel bad about it.
    -Brian

    "Too many crappy used drum stuff to list"

    Play the SONG......not the DRUMS!!!

    "I think that feeling is a lot more important than technique. It's all very well doing a triple paradiddle - but who's going to know you've done it? If you play technically you sound like everybody else. It's being original that counts." ~ John Bonham

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by N2Bluz View Post
    Well said.

    I remember a guy at one of our jams. He got up during a break and played a fantastic drum solo. He had all these cool chops and was faster with one hand than I am with both. After the next set, he complemented me on and on about my playing. I was astonished that he would say that, given his skill level. I suggested he sit in on a few songs (Blues). He said he had only ever played thrash metal and didn't want to at first, but I encouraged him to give it a shot. The first song was a medium fast shuffle, and it was a complete train wreck. He was completely lost. I felt terrible for him and like a complete jerk myself......but I honestly never imagined that he would struggle with any song that I could ever play. I remember thinking; why doesn't he just listen to the bass line? Why did he try to stick a fill in there...its standard 12bar Blues, couldn't he hear where the chord progression was going? I still feel bad about it.
    Reminds me of a time a long time ago. In our home town we had a music studio place we rented for jamming and guys would come and hang. This was in the early days of Rush when Neil P was starting to really bust out. Well, there was this guy, Jerry, nice guy, (first Peartite I'd met) He'd get on the drums and do Neil Peart fills to a Tee. I Remember my jaw being on the floor and kinda jealous of Jerry a bit.
    One day we had him sit in on a tune. It was a straight country blues kinda thing. Poor Jerry was completely lost. I don't think he was able to find the "one" for the entire song.
    I had to smile.

    To N2....never under estimate what you do. It may be simple from a technical stand point but musical sensitivity is something very important, especially when you're pulled out from your familiar environment. Many can learn chops, but only a few understand music at the soul level.

    all the best...

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by kay-gee View Post
    Reminds me of a time a long time ago. In our home town we had a music studio place we rented for jamming and guys would come and hang. This was in the early days of Rush when Neil P was starting to really bust out. Well, there was this guy, Jerry, nice guy, (first Peartite I'd met) He'd get on the drums and do Neil Peart fills to a Tee. I Remember my jaw being on the floor and kinda jealous of Jerry a bit.
    One day we had him sit in on a tune. It was a straight country blues kinda thing. Poor Jerry was completely lost. I don't think he was able to find the "one" for the entire song.
    I had to smile.

    To N2....never under estimate what you do. It may be simple from a technical stand point but musical sensitivity is something very important, especially when you're pulled out from your familiar environment. Many can learn chops, but only a few understand music at the soul level.

    all the best...
    I must say...both of you get it! Nice quote and stories.

  15. #15

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    This post hit home as I'm experiencing this at the moment. Saw on the band's website they finally found a new drummer...and they're in the process of releasing our new album (which I played on) and organizing their album release party. I don't think I'll go see them live ever again (who knows) because I would have a hard time seeing someone else play the parts I wrote. It would be interesting to see someone else try to play some of the more difficult parts I wrote. You know how some things just come naturally to a musician, but very difficult for someone to replicate? Not that they're difficult, it's just what your mind created at the time that came easy to you.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdeleone View Post
    This post hit home as I'm experiencing this at the moment. Saw on the band's website they finally found a new drummer...and they're in the process of releasing our new album (which I played on) and organizing their album release party. I don't think I'll go see them live ever again (who knows) because I would have a hard time seeing someone else play the parts I wrote. It would be interesting to see someone else try to play some of the more difficult parts I wrote. You know how some things just come naturally to a musician, but very difficult for someone to replicate? Not that they're difficult, it's just what your mind created at the time that came easy to you.
    I can understand how you feel. Think how Peter Cetera and Danny Seraphine felt when Chicago got inducted into the RNRHOF.

    You should go anyway. You were a part of it. Now you can mingle in the audience and get recognition without having to play.
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  17. #17

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    I ran into my ex-wife a few years back with a new boyfriend. It was a weird. It was like seeing your old band with a new drummer and I caught myself shaking my head and saying to myself, "I used to play in that band?"

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by late8 View Post
    I ran into my ex-wife a few years back with a new boyfriend. It was a weird. It was like seeing your old band with a new drummer and I caught myself shaking my head and saying to myself, "I used to play in that band?"
    Ha, yeah I could imagine that would be a strange one

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by N2Bluz View Post
    Well said.

    I remember a guy at one of our jams. He got up during a break and played a fantastic drum solo. He had all these cool chops and was faster with one hand than I am with both. After the next set, he complemented me on and on about my playing. I was astonished that he would say that, given his skill level. I suggested he sit in on a few songs (Blues). He said he had only ever played thrash metal and didn't want to at first, but I encouraged him to give it a shot. The first song was a medium fast shuffle, and it was a complete train wreck. He was completely lost. I felt terrible for him and like a complete jerk myself......but I honestly never imagined that he would struggle with any song that I could ever play. I remember thinking; why doesn't he just listen to the bass line? Why did he try to stick a fill in there...its standard 12bar Blues, couldn't he hear where the chord progression was going? I still feel bad about it.
    Everyone one is good at what THEY do. I was in the same boat as that guy. I've been shredding double kick and blast beats at 240bpm for the last 10 years but my shuffle, swing, samba, fills, were all crappy... heck even my double stroke roll and paradiddles were garbage.

    I am on a mission to work on that stuff now.. the nice thing is that my endurance and single strokes are great so its just getting it all in to muscle memory... oh and playing deathmetal is all 100% velocity so I am relearning dynamics and ghost notes.

    I have often complemented someone who isn't nearly as fast as me, but they can groove like no ones business and I wish i could play like that. toss me in with a blues band and I would have fallen apart last year also.

    I have also had drummers I consider out of my league complement me and it feels great. I actually had someone pretty famous asking me some advice online this week about something and was downright shocked.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bish View Post
    I can understand how you feel. Think how Peter Cetera and Danny Seraphine felt when Chicago got inducted into the RNRHOF.

    You should go anyway. You were a part of it. Now you can mingle in the audience and get recognition without having to play.
    Yeah it's knida fun to see how it sounds with someone different. They won't need to know you are there if it's one of those situations, just slip in after they start and slip out before they're done
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  21. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by late8 View Post
    I ran into my ex-wife a few years back with a new boyfriend. It was a weird. It was like seeing your old band with a new drummer and I caught myself shaking my head and saying to myself, "I used to play in that band?"
    I don't have an ex-wife, but if we got divorced and that happened to me, my reaction would probably be, "I wonder if he knows what he's getting into?"

    Quote Originally Posted by scottyp View Post
    Everyone one is good at what THEY do. I was in the same boat as that guy. I've been shredding double kick and blast beats at 240bpm for the last 10 years but my shuffle, swing, samba, fills, were all crappy... heck even my double stroke roll and paradiddles were garbage.

    I am on a mission to work on that stuff now.. the nice thing is that my endurance and single strokes are great so its just getting it all in to muscle memory... oh and playing deathmetal is all 100% velocity so I am relearning dynamics and ghost notes.

    I have often complemented someone who isn't nearly as fast as me, but they can groove like no ones business and I wish i could play like that. toss me in with a blues band and I would have fallen apart last year also.

    I have also had drummers I consider out of my league complement me and it feels great. I actually had someone pretty famous asking me some advice online this week about something and was downright shocked.
    That's the thing. I wouldn't last 3 minutes playing your style of music.....if I even could at all. Honestly, I doubt I'll ever even try....although I would like to work on my speed and techniques. It never crossed my mind that this guy would struggle. I equated speed with total ability and experience. That shows a lack of awareness and experience on my part. I know there are guys out there that can do it all. I guess they're called Jazz drummers?
    -Brian

    "Too many crappy used drum stuff to list"

    Play the SONG......not the DRUMS!!!

    "I think that feeling is a lot more important than technique. It's all very well doing a triple paradiddle - but who's going to know you've done it? If you play technically you sound like everybody else. It's being original that counts." ~ John Bonham

  22. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdeleone View Post
    This post hit home as I'm experiencing this at the moment. Saw on the band's website they finally found a new drummer...and they're in the process of releasing our new album (which I played on) and organizing their album release party. I don't think I'll go see them live ever again (who knows) because I would have a hard time seeing someone else play the parts I wrote. It would be interesting to see someone else try to play some of the more difficult parts I wrote. You know how some things just come naturally to a musician, but very difficult for someone to replicate? Not that they're difficult, it's just what your mind created at the time that came easy to you.
    The group I record with always invite me to the CD release parties . I go and they always make it a point to let people know that I was the one who recorded the drum parts .
    Thing is that they don't have a steady drummer . They always have someone different every time they do a gig . Some of them try to play the parts others just blow through the gig and solo every song .
    I don't feel weird about it at all .
    Rudy .

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