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Thread: Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

  1. #1

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    Default Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

    Hey, all. Try to make this short and sweet, I'm an upstart trying to learn drums for the first time. Always been an Enthusiast but never had a place to put a drum set. Now that I have my own house I would definitely like to start getting some knowledge so I can be ready when I decide to purchase one.

    The thing I noticing and looking around and seeing what drum sets are the most recommended, seeing as I'm feeling pretty set on an electronic kit, is they seem to be pretty limited. Even some of the top rated sets appear this way, including the one that most appealed to me. Most of the sets I've seen simply include a pair of crashes, occasionally a ride. Are there any sets out there that extend into china and/or splash? Or is this just simply a matter of expansion? How would one go about this? Or are electronic kits just limited to what they appear at the moment? Although I may be new, I would definitely love to have my set be as complex as possible for when I become better.

    Thanks for any help.

  2. #2

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    Default Re: Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

    Why, if you have your own house, are you set on getting an electric kit? Is it family noise considerations? I hope it's not because you're daunted by managing an acoustic set.
    I say this because electronic kits are inherently limited. There's only so many triggers with X number of dynamic responses and presets.
    And the cymbals are simply a joke IMO.
    Acoustic sets are infinite and real cymbals are joyously complex. So many different places and ways to strike and even different sticks and tips for different sounds.
    Yes, it takes a while to learn how to control them and get the sounds you want but it's all part of the journey and so very worth it.

  3. #3

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    Default Re: Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

    Quote Originally Posted by noreastbob View Post
    Why, if you have your own house, are you set on getting an electric kit? Is it family noise considerations? I hope it's not because you're daunted by managing an acoustic set.
    I say this because electronic kits are inherently limited. There's only so many triggers with X number of dynamic responses and presets.
    And the cymbals are simply a joke IMO.
    Acoustic sets are infinite and real cymbals are joyously complex. So many different places and ways to strike and even different sticks and tips for different sounds.
    Yes, it takes a while to learn how to control them and get the sounds you want but it's all part of the journey and so very worth it.
    Partially because my wife is a musician and we've long talked about recording music together and it's more cost efficient and pertinent for us. I don't necessarily plan on becoming a pro, something basic will suit me fine. Would also love to play anytime without disturbing her or neighbors as I'm a night owl. I can always get an acoustic down the line but feel electronic is a better fit for me all around. I'm aware of the limitations in acoustic function, right now I'm just wondering how you can expand these sets to include other pieces, if possible.
    Last edited by DCFan11; 05-17-2019 at 09:07 AM.

  4. #4

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    Default Re: Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

    Welcome to Drum Chat.

    I've owned a few over the years, even built one myself back in the late 90's. They've come a long way since then.

    I'm not sure about your budget but to me the important things are the number of samples you have and how good do they sound? Are they realistic?

    I also look at quality. If there isn't a good amount of sensitivity you don't get to articulate like you should be able to.

    Last but important I'd look at build quality. I don't want something that falls apart after my first 15 minute drum solo. lol

    You really should find a way to play them and see what they do and if it fits your idea of what you expect.

    Me....I'd have a blast and go full on medium to high end just because I know the expectations are met and exceeded in the use and enjoyment of E-Kits.

    Keep posting questions as your investigation gets going. It's a fun journey just learning about this technology and then bring it home to mama!
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  5. #5

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    Default Re: Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

    Quote Originally Posted by Bish View Post
    Welcome to Drum Chat.

    I've owned a few over the years, even built one myself back in the late 90's. They've come a long way since then.

    I'm not sure about your budget but to me the important things are the number of samples you have and how good do they sound? Are they realistic?

    I also look at quality. If there isn't a good amount of sensitivity you don't get to articulate like you should be able to.

    Last but important I'd look at build quality. I don't want something that falls apart after my first 15 minute drum solo. lol

    You really should find a way to play them and see what they do and if it fits your idea of what you expect.

    Me....I'd have a blast and go full on medium to high end just because I know the expectations are met and exceeded in the use and enjoyment of E-Kits.

    Keep posting questions as your investigation gets going. It's a fun journey just learning about this technology and then bring it home to mama!
    I appreciate your response. However, I prefer to be completely aware of what I'm buying before I buy it. I definitely want something specific, and to know everything about it so that when I buy it I might not ever have to buy another one again if I so choose. I've already seen with some of the top ones and would generally have an idea of what I might want to buy, especially with some advice from some folks around here, but right now I guess my first basic question is are there any electronic drum sets that actually allow you to use more than just a couple of crashes for the symbols? Or is there a way to expand them? I really don't want to be restricted to such a small amount of options.

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

    Quote Originally Posted by DCFan11 View Post
    I appreciate your response. However, I prefer to be completely aware of what I'm buying before I buy it. I definitely want something specific, and to know everything about it so that when I buy it I might not ever have to buy another one again if I so choose. I've already seen with some of the top ones and would generally have an idea of what I might want to buy, especially with some advice from some folks around here, but right now I guess my first basic question is are there any electronic drum sets that actually allow you to use more than just a couple of crashes for the symbols? Or is there a way to expand them? I really don't want to be restricted to such a small amount of options.

    Fair question and requirement. I would hope you know what you are getting into before you drop a couple thousand dollars on an idea.

    If I were you I would research just the modules to find one that fits your requirements. Back when I built mine, I had an Alesis D4 combined with a Roland TD-5 module and basically built my own kit out of PVC and plywood. (there was a lot of experimentation that went into building an electric kit 25 years ago) but I was determined to have the best I could. With the combination of both modules I was able to have everything I could want with extra channels left open. That allows the ability to add effects like a cowbell, wood block, tambourine, etc.

    Nothing says you can't do that today. You can start by buying the module that meets your demands or gets as close to it as possible. If the module manufacturer makes a drum pad set that fits that needs you're golden.

    If not, get as close as you can and eventually add on an additional module as you go. That can get pricey.

    I know today you can get a fairly decent larger E-kit for a couple grand. I'm not sure what more you'd want but the limit is your creativity and most likely budget.
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  7. #7

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    Default Re: Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

    Quote Originally Posted by Bish View Post
    Fair question and requirement. I would hope you know what you are getting into before you drop a couple thousand dollars on an idea.

    If I were you I would research just the modules to find one that fits your requirements. Back when I built mine, I had an Alesis D4 combined with a Roland TD-5 module and basically built my own kit out of PVC and plywood. (there was a lot of experimentation that went into building an electric kit 25 years ago) but I was determined to have the best I could. With the combination of both modules I was able to have everything I could want with extra channels left open. That allows the ability to add effects like a cowbell, wood block, tambourine, etc.

    Nothing says you can't do that today. You can start by buying the module that meets your demands or gets as close to it as possible. If the module manufacturer makes a drum pad set that fits that needs you're golden.

    If not, get as close as you can and eventually add on an additional module as you go. That can get pricey.

    I know today you can get a fairly decent larger E-kit for a couple grand. I'm not sure what more you'd want but the limit is your creativity and most likely budget.
    So do any of these electronic sets come with the extra cymbals or allow extension for them or all they basically just restricted to crashes and occassionaly a ride?

  8. #8

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    Default Re: Newbie looking for help with choosing electronic set

    Quote Originally Posted by DCFan11 View Post
    So do any of these electronic sets come with the extra cymbals or allow extension for them or all they basically just restricted to crashes and occassionaly a ride?
    In general, most entry level E-kits modules come with 1 Hihat, 1 crash, 1 ride, 2 high toms, 1 floor tom, snare and a kick drum that could be used with a double pedal.

    I had an old Yamaha DTXpress III (2004 technology) that had: 1 high hat, 2 crash, 2 toms. 1 floor tom, snare and kick. This module could NOT be expanded. The voice samples for the different cymbals can be selected and assigned to different pieces of the kit. The ride had 3 zones: bell, bow and edge. The one crash was dual zone: edge and choke. The snare had 3 zones: rimshot, snare and cross stick. The hihat had 3 zones: edge, bow and splash.





    The more expensive Roland modules allow for more expansion.



    This kit is a TD30 and a TD9 combined:

    Last edited by late8; Today at 11:10 AM.

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