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Thread: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

  1. #1

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    Default Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Hi:
    I have watched a few videos,specifically regarding playing a single paradiddle with a triplet feel.
    I can't seem to get it...do I need to play to a click?. I don't have any problem with playing a single paradiddle as eighths or sixteenths notes,but I just can't get the triplet feel down.
    How do you count single paradiddles as triplets?
    Playing on pad now,as no drums as yet.(beginner)
    Do I need to break it all down in segments?
    Appreciate any help on this topic. Thanks.
    Last edited by Huck; 12-03-2020 at 01:15 PM.

  2. #2

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Quote Originally Posted by Huck View Post
    Hi:
    I have watched a few videos,specifically regarding playing a single paradiddle with a triplet feel.
    I can't seem to get it...do I need to play to a click?. I don't have any problem with playing a single paradiddle as eighths or sixteenths notes,but I just can't get the triplet feel down.
    How do you count single paradiddles as triplets?
    Playing on pad now,as no drums as yet.(beginner)
    Do I need to break it all down in segments?
    Appreciate any help on this topic. Thanks.
    Hi Huck,
    I find it best to teach this with writing down a couple bars of eight note triplets and placing the RLRR LRLL over those triplets so the student can visually see how it will lay among the triplets. I think this helps with understanding how it's supposed to feel and how it goes over the bar line. You don't have to a great reader to do this. It's something you can do yourself. Try that and it should help.

    Edit: I found it online. Go to this link and it's the top bar in this exercise. https://www.onjazzdrumming.com/jazz-...nversions.html

  3. #3

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Thanks for posting that linky,but those note markings and values mean basically nothing to me,other than a 1/8 note is twice as fast as a 1/4 note,etc.
    I thought maybe there was something easier out there? Looks very intimidating to me and hard to get the flow.Not sure I can get this.
    I tried playing a regular triplet RLR,LRL,etc at 100bpm and then tried to throw in a single paradiddle at that same bpm and it went right into a regular paradiddle....how come?!Thanks.
    Last edited by Huck; 12-03-2020 at 04:05 PM.

  4. #4

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    You asked about playing with a click and the answer is "absolutely!". It helps you know where the downbeat is while practicing this. Being able to hear it is half the ball game. Here's a video where a guy walks through playing it against a click. Maybe this will help.


  5. #5

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    These things come in time. Don't make yourself nuts over 1 thing when there is so much more to playing drums than a "paradiddle with a triplet feel".

    Taking lessons is a good thing (so I've been told), but, at the beginning, there are going to be a lot of things that, 4-5 years down the road, you are going to look back and think "I let this bother me".

    At some point in time your teacher will (probably) tell you to get Stone's book. It looks like a Chinese menu and will make you start to think that an asylum is a viable alternative to what you are doing. Move on and come back to it in a month or so and it probably won't seem as hard.
    YOU MESS WITH THE DEVIL YOU KNOW.

    YOU DON'T MESS WITH THE DEVIL YOU DON'T KNOW.

    VAE VICTIS

    ONCE YOU HIT A CERTAIN AGE, YOU BECOME PERMANENTLY UNIMPRESSED BY A LOT OF CRAP.

    I HIT THAT AGE 20 YEARS AGO.

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Thanks! I saw that video earlier today,so maybe watching and listening to someone actually playing it would help me better in the long run...I dunno.Thanks for posting that video!
    Sounds to me that nothing he is playing lines up( at least to my beginner ears) with the click other than the first beat farther along which happens to line up. Maybe this concept is too early for me right now to grasp.
    Last edited by Huck; 12-03-2020 at 05:15 PM.

  7. #7

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Quote Originally Posted by Huck View Post
    Thanks! I saw that video earlier today,so maybe watching and listening to someone actually playing it would help me better in the long run...I dunno.Thanks for posting that video!
    Sounds to me that nothing he is playing lines up( at least to my beginner ears) with the click other than the first beat farther along which happens to line up. Maybe this concept is too early for me right now to grasp.
    Not necessarily too early but it is something that you have to mess with a few times before it finally 'clicks'. You're used to hearing a paradiddle over straight time so when you put it over triplets and play it, you have to learn NOT to hear it in straight time but to hear it how it falls over triplets. You have to be hearing the triplet feel while you're playing it. Like Rick said, practice it but don't be too stressed about it. It will eventually just click and then seem easy. Good luck!

  8. #8

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Thanks!

  9. #9

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Quote Originally Posted by drummer View Post
    Not necessarily too early but it is something that you have to mess with a few times before it finally 'clicks'. You're used to hearing a paradiddle over straight time so when you put it over triplets and play it, you have to learn NOT to hear it in straight time but to hear it how it falls over triplets. You have to be hearing the triplet feel while you're playing it. Like Rick said, practice it but don't be too stressed about it. It will eventually just click and then seem easy. Good luck!
    Thanks! Seems that is my main problem,not being able to listen NOT to hear it in straight time.
    I found a video of something I thought would be easier to grasp,that being double strokes played as triplets and I still can't get that!!...how would I count double strokes played as triplets,such as (doubles)... RR(1,2),LL(3,4)..(RR LL,1,2,3,4)..maybe if I count them (triplet feel) out,it will be easier for me,not sure.Thanks for all the help on this...much appreciated!
    Last edited by Huck; 12-06-2020 at 09:30 AM.

  10. #10

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    If you can hear it in your head you can put it to stick and skin.

    This works for me with so many things relating to music.

    Once asked if I play gnashing my teeth. Not on the kit per se but when I'm working on something in my mind. Why yes, I do. I can not only hear it in my head but I don't have to be tied to a drum pad and sticks. I can get my body to feel the count and then translate it to the sticks. Mind over matter to begin with.

    I guess what I'm getting at is there's a feel that comes over you when you are "in the groove" so to speak. I can work on drum parts to new songs and beat myself up over playing it or it puts me to sleep listening to it over and over. Once you can memorize it, your body, your muscle training and other senses will automatically step in at some point.

    Let it come over you. Don't force it.
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  11. #11

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Quote Originally Posted by Bish View Post
    If you can hear it in your head you can put it to stick and skin.

    This works for me with so many things relating to music.

    Once asked if I play gnashing my teeth. Not on the kit per se but when I'm working on something in my mind. Why yes, I do. I can not only hear it in my head but I don't have to be tied to a drum pad and sticks. I can get my body to feel the count and then translate it to the sticks. Mind over matter to begin with.

    I guess what I'm getting at is there's a feel that comes over you when you are "in the groove" so to speak. I can work on drum parts to new songs and beat myself up over playing it or it puts me to sleep listening to it over and over. Once you can memorize it, your body, your muscle training and other senses will automatically step in at some point.

    Let it come over you. Don't force it.
    Thanks...so when or how long does it take before this "feeling that comes over you when you are in the groove"?
    I always seems to 'hear' the beat or pulse,say,on a song on t.v. and the audience is clapping to the music,but not clapping in time(beat) to what I am doing,which at the time seemed 'wrong' to me...maybe that's what I have to break away from?!
    Anyways,I think I can 'get' the counting to a paradiddle-diddle in a triplet feel by counting...RL(1),RR(2),LL(3)...does that seem correct?...at least I can count at a slower speed,but not sure about anything faster.
    How would I count double strokes as a triplets feel?Thanks.
    Last edited by Huck; 12-06-2020 at 08:36 PM.

  12. #12

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    There's no time limit or expectation. It doesn't happen just once either. It's on going or a work in progress. Sometimes everything clicks and others you just want to give up and take up knitting. At least Rick does.

    With any new project (other than skiing or riding a bike) slow and steady will get you there quicker. You have to put in the time and practice and as you do the speed and accuracy will also develop.

    Pro musicians put in the time like you and I who work a full time job. That's what they do and why they are where they are. Do you have that dedication? Then you'll get there.
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  13. #13

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    I agree 100% about slow and easy.How do I count double strokes as triplets?.Is my counting of paradiddle-diddle correct.....(RL(1),RR(2),LL(3)...RLRRLL(1,2,3,)?.. .also how do I train my brain to listen to the 'wrong' beat or pulse? Any particular exercise/song?Thanks
    Last edited by Huck; 12-08-2020 at 05:55 AM.

  14. #14

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Maybe if I split up the groupings,using a double para-diddle as an example...if I played it as...RLR,LRR,LRL,RLL.....played slow,would that get me to the triplet feel? Not sure if I am asking the question in a proper way?! Thanks

  15. #15

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Quote Originally Posted by Huck View Post
    I agree 100% about slow and easy.How do I count double strokes as triplets?.Is my counting of paradiddle-diddle correct.....(RL(1),RR(2),LL(3)...RLRRLL(1,2,3,)?.. .also how do I train my brain to listen to the 'wrong' beat or pulse? Any particular exercise/song?Thanks
    Instead of groupings of 2's, try groupings of 3's laid over 4/4. Think of how you count triplets. 1 & ah 2 & ah 3 & ah 4 & ah. You end up with this:

    (RLR) (RLR) (LLR) (LRR) (LRL) and so on. As you do this count it to yourself as 1 & ah 2 & ah 3 & ah 4 & ah. Start very slowly and work your speed up as you feel comfortable. You'll be amazed at how quickly you'll get the hang of it and then insert it as a fill while you're playing.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by inthpktplayer; 01-08-2021 at 10:22 AM.

  16. #16

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Ha! I found an old video where I was demonstrating this. Hope it helps.


  17. #17

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Quote Originally Posted by rickthedrummer View Post
    These things come in time. Don't make yourself nuts over 1 thing when there is so much more to playing drums than a "paradiddle with a triplet feel".

    Taking lessons is a good thing (so I've been told), but, at the beginning, there are going to be a lot of things that, 4-5 years down the road, you are going to look back and think "I let this bother me".

    At some point in time your teacher will (probably) tell you to get Stone's book. It looks like a Chinese menu and will make you start to think that an asylum is a viable alternative to what you are doing. Move on and come back to it in a month or so and it probably won't seem as hard.
    I think you are right , Rick.

    I have tried so hard to follow all the things I have read about and it just plain took all the fun out of it for me.
    I am a 65 year old guy that always wanted to be a drummer but never got the chance to try.
    I have tried for many years now to get it, but I am resigned to the fact that if you are not a natural drummer, you will fail as I have.
    You have been a great inspiration but.........I just cant seem to get there.
    Thanks my friend
    Take care and seeya!

    Jim

  18. #18

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    Default Re: Playing single paradiddle with a triplet feel with practice pad

    Quote Originally Posted by inthpktplayer View Post
    Instead of groupings of 2's, try groupings of 3's laid over 4/4. Think of how you count triplets. 1 & ah 2 & ah 3 & ah 4 & ah. You end up with this:

    (RLR) (RLR) (LLR) (LRR) (LRL) and so on. As you do this count it to yourself as 1 & ah 2 & ah 3 & ah 4 & ah. Start very slowly and work your speed up as you feel comfortable. You'll be amazed at how quickly you'll get the hang of it and then insert it as a fill while you're playing.

    Good luck.
    Thanks...I will try that slow and see if I can work my way up...no drums yet,but lots of practice pads.Thanks,Huck

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