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Thread: The good and the bad

  1. #1

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    Default The good and the bad

    In the last few days I have been doing a lot of reading old post looking at a lot of kit pics the information on here awesome and lots of it. That's the good. As I'm from new Zealand lots of our drums come from Asia and have done for a while, the American and english are more rare here, so haven't look at them much. Today was look at Rogers drum. Looking at pics and identified the second kit I restored it was a Rogers the bad is it was the first kit I sold, if I knew 3 months ago I would of put it away(yes I'm a greenhorn) a positive Is its local so maybe able to get it back at a later date.
    Off to research singerlands and lids before I do it again

  2. #2

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    Dam spell check. singerlands and luds

  3. #3

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    For me, Slingerland and Ludwigs are too old school. Wasn't my generation

  4. #4

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    When I was starting out it was Rogers,Ludwigs,Slingerlands and Premiers.
    Rick


    Mapex Sabian Ludwig Saluda Assorted Snare Drums

  5. #5

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    For me it was Tama Pearl Yamaha Ludwig and even some Remo sets. Decided on a Tama shell pack in 83. Those are long gone but I still have all the hardware from those days sitting in the garage. Sentimental reasons keep me from getting rid of them
    RDM/Damage Poets
    UFiP TAMAHA Zildjian
    REGAL TiP
    AQUARIAN

  6. #6

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    A remo sets is up for sale now $175 us

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpazApproved View Post
    For me, Slingerland and Ludwigs are too old school. Wasn't my generation
    Same. Some guys love that vintage look/sound but it never interested me. That said, I've owned Rogers (hated the hardware), Ludwig, and Premier drumsets at different points along the way but they were never my main kit.

  8. #8

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    I really did DW and Mapex.
    Six Piece Mapex Saturn V, Six piece Mapex Armory, Slingerland Studio King, DW Design Seried, and Mapex Exterminator drums, Centent Emperor cymbals.


  9. #9

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    When I was a kid starting out playing drums, Ludwigs and Slingerlands were tops.......I had a little bit of knowledge with Gretsch and Rogers as well.
    All of these drums were American and all were of high quality -- they didn't offer 5 or 6 different lines like they do today, except for maybe a student model snare drum.
    In the late 70s, I saw a set of Pearls in the music store -- these were very cheap drums made like trash, so I thought all Pearl drums were bad for many years.
    These days all the makers offer a quality shell and others too, some good, some not so good.

    My first kit was a late 50s Slingy -- black and gold duco -- I remember the bass drum was single tension.....bought them used in the Summer of 64.
    My second set was 73 Ludwig.....walnut gloss.....excellent drums that now would be considered the Legacy line.....they were only 6 months old when I found them.
    I traded those in when I ordered my Gretsch USA Custom shells in 1977, which I still play today.....ebony maple gloss.
    I've never found a reason to change since I bought the Gretsch.

    I've played on Tama Superclassic, Sonor, DW Collectors, Pearl Masters, and others.....all great drums.
    None of them were any better than my vintage Gretsch SSB (Jasper) shells.
    Gretsch USA & Zildjian
    (What Else Would I Ever Need ?)


  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwacker View Post
    A remo sets is up for sale now $175 us
    The older Remo sets were interesting. They had a lot of different ideas that they tried out. Two that come to mind are the "quick release lugs" and the "Acousticon" shells. The early Remo shells inside were brown and the bearing edges are soft. You need to be careful not to damage the edge if cranking down a head too much, especially the snare drums. The inside of the shell almost looks like cardboard which a lot of people referred to them as being just that. They kind of feel tacky to touch. As far as I know it's wood fiber and glue pressed together, notice the thin ply edges almost like paper. I never played a full set of Acousticon's, however I have one of the snares and it sounded pretty good. Not sure what SE stood for. Special Edition maybe? The later Remo shells were sturdier (from what I hear) and black inside. The name Acousticon was the name they gave the shells and Quadura was the name of the wrap. My drum doesn't have the quick release lugs. Just regular ones and you can see that one broke while playing the drum. Cheap pot metal.

    20220202_150551.jpg

    20220202_150204.jpg
    Last edited by slinky; 02-02-2022 at 04:49 PM.
    RDM/Damage Poets
    UFiP TAMAHA Zildjian
    REGAL TiP
    AQUARIAN

  11. #11

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    RDM/Damage Poets
    UFiP TAMAHA Zildjian
    REGAL TiP
    AQUARIAN

  12. #12

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    RDM/Damage Poets
    UFiP TAMAHA Zildjian
    REGAL TiP
    AQUARIAN

  13. #13

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    That last photo I have that snare. Is in a box at the bottom of the pile as the snare wire been to tight and pulled the bearing edge, couldn't see that in photo when I bought $150us, but then again I couldn't see the it was a whole kit. Unamed

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