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Thread: Your limitations

  1. #1

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    Default Your limitations

    Hey there,

    I know we all have certain ammounts of pieces in our sets. But there must be kind of a limit right now, low and high numbers, im curious about your low numbers...

    According to popular belief, the more pieces you got, the better you can play. I say, contrary to popular belief, the less pieces you can play with, the better you are (can be). In the sense, how well you can use your creativity with critical numbers.

    I can't go lower than Snare, BassD, and Ride to play along with a band. So that makes my lower limit to 2 pieces and 1 cymbal (lets count them all together = 3). Of course i can go just with my snare if i were alone...

    Upper limits depend on the kind of music you play and your style. Im more into jazz and blues, so having more than 7 toms and 10 cymbals would be kinda overwelming for me (played with such a kit once, friend). I did play well but didnt feel confortable myself. I like to keep it simple. Also the higher limit is affected by the budget!

    But what about you guys? What is the lower you can get?

    I know many of you will say that it depends on your style and all that, but put yourself in a situation where you were asked to jam with a terrific band and you dont have your drums there, are you just going to say "NO, thanks." just because of their drums?

    This might look kinda lame, but if you know your limits now, you can work your style to break them in a future, right? Know thyself!

  2. #2

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    I can usually mix it up with only hi-hat and bass for a whole song, so I guess my lowest is two pieces.
    I could never see myself, however, going with less than five toms, a few crashes, ride, hats, bass, and effect drums to mix up and have fun with lol.
    www.myspace.com/maudeephyfe
    The good times won't roll themselves
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  3. #3

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    Hi-hat, snare, tom , Bdrum and crash/ride would be the lowest i would go. But like 32nd, I prefer more toms and cymbals for mixing it up and having fun
    I play, Gretsch Catalina Birch, 7 piece in the vintage sunburst finish.


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  4. #4

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    Bass drum , snare drum, and high hat

  5. #5

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    interresting...

    do you guys think that the hats are more "important" than the snare for the rythm???

    I could do it without hats, but dont think i could without the snare...

    i agree with the more drums, the more fun you have :D

  6. #6

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    I don't think that snares are more important than hats. because with brushes you can get by with no hats at all. but hats offer versitility because you can open them and the top hat can act as a ride cymbal and you can crash it if need be and you can use the high hat pedal to establish rytham. So if I could only have three pieces I would choose a snare, bass drum and Hats.
    Last edited by backtodrum; 01-07-2008 at 12:37 PM.

  7. #7

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    Minimum will be HHat, snare, bdrum, and 1 tom. Add 2 toms, 2 cymbals, and cowbell for maximum.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Church Punk View Post
    interresting...

    do you guys think that the hats are more "important" than the snare for the rythm???
    You could ask a set player this question and your answer would probably be yes, but then you've got people in drum corps and what not who could keep rhythm in rudiments and high speeds.
    If you can't keep the beat and rhythm mental, then it's your best bet to use a hi hat, but anything that you can click a stick against with little sustain is good for that.
    www.myspace.com/maudeephyfe
    The good times won't roll themselves
    Gretsch Renown Maple, Paiste Signature, Reflector, and Dark Energy

  9. #9

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    I have to say 1 piece - my djembe.

    I have played a few acoustic gigs where I have used my djembe for the whole thing and nothing else. I can live without hats because playing hand percussion has taught me to keep time without the sound of hearing the meter. When I am playing one drum, time is measured in distance most of the time ( ie. when I am playing a slower tempo, my hands travel further away from the head in between slaps, whereas, if I am playing a fast beat, my hands barely leave the drumhead) unless I am playing a complicated rythm, then I usually tap my toe to keep time ( much like a guitar or bass player).

    On a kit, I would have to say snare, bass, 1 tom, and a ride cymbal.
    Da' Bum
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  10. #10

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    i once did a gig ware i just played on what ever was avalible the venue said dont bring a set and i said ok so just brought sticks they said they would have hand drums and a snare they lied i played on some chair, my own hands, and the floor, it was a freaking blast but i would never chose to do it again if i had an option of at least a snare or hats so the least i can play is 0 the least id want to play is one but if theres no kit ill play the zero.
    my max is 3 rack 2 floor 2 ride 8 crash 2 bass 2 snare 2 hats and a buch o efects
    play till the day i die. it makes more sense that way.

    "You should set up your drums around the toilet. You know you must use it everyday and lets be realistic, nothing better is going on when your sitting on there. Why not take care of business and play the drums." silver dragon sound

  11. #11

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    Bass and snare, though I can do some weird stuff with a marching bass. 2 pieces. Single pedal if having a double counts as three pieces.

  12. #12

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    Lowest limit on drums is a bass and a snare. The highest I will go is maybe a double bass 8 piece(5 toms) but anything higher would be way overwhelming. I can handle any amount of cymbals if i know what they sound like. I am a metal drummer so yeah. If i am playing softer music or something(like when i jam with my dad), it is more comfortable with a bit of a smaller kit though.
    The best things in life involve drums. Drums drums and more drums. oh yeah.

  13. #13

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    Cool Your limitations

    Quote Originally Posted by 1DrumBum View Post
    I have to say 1 piece - my djembe.

    I have played a few acoustic gigs where I have used my djembe for the whole thing and nothing else. I can live without hats because playing hand percussion has taught me to keep time without the sound of hearing the meter. When I am playing one drum, time is measured in distance most of the time ( ie. when I am playing a slower tempo, my hands travel further away from the head in between slaps, whereas, if I am playing a fast beat, my hands barely leave the drumhead) unless I am playing a complicated rythm, then I usually tap my toe to keep time ( much like a guitar or bass player)...
    That's where hand drummers have the edge...one djembe, one conga, or a pair of bongos can do the job of a drum kit...and like you, 1DB, I've jammed out on a single conga very nicely.

    For a kit, three would be enough (bass, snare and high-hat)...you can get a multitude of effects by the sticks and brushes you use, and by using rimshots and knocks on the snare and by opening or closing off the high-hats to choke off the sound.

    I've even seen a three-piece combo where a conga replaced the snare and that kicked, also...
    keep the beat goin' ... Don't keep it to yourself!

    Charlie

    "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away." --Henry David Thoreau, "Walden," 1854

    "There's a lot to be said for Time Honored tradition and value." --In memory of Frank "fiacovaz" Iacovazzi

    "Maybe your drums can be beat, but you can't."--Jack Keck

  14. #14

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    Cool Limitations According To Phrogge

    We Have No Limitations
    Except The Ones We Place Upon Ourselves
    "FEEL DA GROOVE & PLAY IT FORWARD..."

    "BEAUTY IS IN THE EARS OF THE BEHOLDER ,
    ENJOY IT ALL,,, MY BROTHERS & SISTERS"

    COMMANDER & CHIEPH OF
    "PHROGGE'S AQUARIAN ARMY"

    CHARTER MEMBER OF THE "OUR
    LADY OF DA NEW BEAT CONGREGATION"

    LEGEND IN MY OWN MIND
    & FORCE BEHIND DA
    "PHX AZ LEGEND OF DA ZYDECO TIE"
    (AND OTHER TOYZ)

  15. #15

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    thats what i said on first post

    I think congas and bongos are a bit different from drums (if played with hands). Tell me if im wrong please, but i thought drummer and percusionist were different.

    Single pedal if having a double counts as three pieces.
    What do you mean by that Roger? You mean, a dualist?

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