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Thread: What training material to get?

  1. #1

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    Default What training material to get?

    Hi,

    My drum teacher and I have now parted company. We kicked off o.k. but he teaches school children for exams and insisted on spending nearly the whole of each lesson on reading music.

    This is the third drum teacher I've been to. They were all good drummers but none of them had any idea of how to teach.

    Can anyone recommend a good course on drumming, one that is structured and takes you steadily through each stage up to intermediate level?

    Thanks,

    Paul.

  2. #2

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    Default Re: What training material to get?

    The only thing I can suggest is finding another satisfying teacher that uses this type of structure. Otherwise, some of these online programs and whatnot have courses like that where you can work up to where you feel comfortable and then move on from there.
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  3. #3

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    Default Re: What training material to get?

    Tommy Igoe's Groove essentials.
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  4. #4

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    Default Re: What training material to get?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dunplaying View Post
    Hi,

    My drum teacher and I have now parted company. We kicked off o.k. but he teaches school children for exams and insisted on spending nearly the whole of each lesson on reading music.

    This is the third drum teacher I've been to. They were all good drummers but none of them had any idea of how to teach.

    Can anyone recommend a good course on drumming, one that is structured and takes you steadily through each stage up to intermediate level?

    Thanks,

    Paul.
    Perhaps you're not disclosing everything here. Much of the lesson time is on reading music. Without the ability to read, there is no progression from one level to another. Speaking of levels, the only level that can truly be determined is a Beginning level. Everything else beyond that is relative to your abilities at any given time. We are taught to read music, to analyze music according to rhythmic structure and then how to count the music so that we can read it and then play it. It's Infinity, always on-going. We can all recommend various books and courses of study. Currently, I am working on Tommy Igoe's Groove Essentials. It's easy for me because I know how to read the music...it's a matter of practice to engage my limbs as I play the patterns. I just about have the Songo pattern nailed and it is a lot of fun to play. How is your ability to read? Hate to tell you but, any teacher who insists on Reading the music is okay by me. Why? Because that teacher will have taught you how you can continue to learn long after your association with him/her has expired. Good Luck!

  5. #5

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    Default Re: What training material to get?

    Hi,

    Perhaps I should explain further.

    What I'm looking for is a book + CD, or DVD course that covers learning to play the drums in a logical, systematic way from beginner through to intermediate level, step by step with every detail explained and each part leading up to the next. I've seen a course by Legacy Learning Systems which does this for the guitar and it is brilliant. But is there an equivalent for the drums?

    As for my teachers, they all taught reading music, which was fine, but the last one had me playing music which included rolls, which I can't do yet and which he never taught me (very frustrating).

    At the moment I'm looking at the Drumsense teaching material, but I can't find any reviews of it. Has anyone used this?

    Thanks,

    Paul.

  6. #6

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    Default Re: What training material to get?

    Paul I suspect that you are looking for an instructional book that makes logical sense to you, in terms of progression. I can totally understand your plight, as I too have gone through that sense of not necessarily understanding where my drum teacher has been, or where he's going. I've even hopped around from one book to another.

    What I have learned, though, is that by staying with him, he has already taken me to places that I didn't know that I could go. Yes, he hops around a bit, but I think he sees what I can learn, and how quickly I can learn it. He constantly challenges me to move on, and not be content with where I am. It can be frustrating at times, but as I think back to where I started, and where I am after just about 7 months of lessons (and I even had to start with a new teacher after 6 weeks, because my original teacher had to have back surgery), I consider myself lucky to have a flexible teacher that seems to know what I need, and is willing to show me the way.

    The last lesson that I did, he completely changed direction on me (we hadn't met in about 6 weeks due to scheduling problems), and I got frustrated because I wanted to show him what I could do since our last lesson. Instead, he showed me a completely new rhythm, with ghost notes, complete with new bass rhythm to complicate it. I didn't even have it in my book, so I ended up going to his kit, and looking over his shoulder as he played it, and reading his book (I'm a strong visual, and auditory learner). I was pretty frustrated when I got home, and even though I tried it on the kit that night, it just seemed so far above me. The following morning, I woke up, and played the rhythm, and had some success, and a short time later, I found that the bass naturally fell into rhythm. My teacher had been smart enough to know that what he was teaching me was building perfectly upon what I already knew. I didn't know it, but he did! That's all I need to keep me going forward. Well, that and maybe an occasional pat on the back for encouragement. I'll have to talk to my teacher about that one!
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  7. #7

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    Default Re: What training material to get?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dunplaying View Post
    Hi,

    Perhaps I should explain further.

    What I'm looking for is a book + CD, or DVD course that covers learning to play the drums in a logical, systematic way from beginner through to intermediate level, step by step with every detail explained and each part leading up to the next. I've seen a course by Legacy Learning Systems which does this for the guitar and it is brilliant. But is there an equivalent for the drums?

    As for my teachers, they all taught reading music, which was fine, but the last one had me playing music which included rolls, which I can't do yet and which he never taught me (very frustrating).

    At the moment I'm looking at the Drumsense teaching material, but I can't find any reviews of it. Has anyone used this?

    Thanks,

    Paul.
    The rolls are not important at this point in your development, and your teacher knows that. When he/she is more confident of your ability to read and play the music, he can then introduce to the Rudiments. The Rudiments are simply sticking patterns including all of the rolls: 5-stroke; 6-stroke;7-stroke;10-stroke; 13-15 and 17 stroke rolls. The rudiments are part of your reading so, once you know how to read, you can play. Once again, regards to method books, there are literally 100's available. Pastor Bob is trying to tell you that it is the consistency of having a teacher take you through the books he suggests for you. Self teaching is more a myth than a reality: how can you teach what you don't know? It's been 43 years since my last lesson and I still have copies of my original lesson books. I still use them as warm-up exercises and pattern exercises around my kit. Because of these, I have maintained my stamina and time keeping prowess. I drum with a contemporary big band that demands that I read the music and drive the band to its very best...and I do just that. And maybe someday, you will to.

  8. #8

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    I don't know anything about Drumsense Teaching Material. If you have it, then use it. I mentioned that I am using Groove Essentials at the present time. I chose this because I wanted to learn more of the World Drum music...something I didn't have 40 some years ago. No matter which method I may have chosen, I will be able to learn from it because of those incessant Reading lessons. Find or go back to your Teacher and stick with it. You will never regret doing this.

  9. #9

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    Cool Re: What training material to get?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dunplaying View Post
    Hi,

    My drum teacher and I have now parted company. We kicked off o.k. but he teaches school children for exams and insisted on spending nearly the whole of each lesson on reading music.

    This is the third drum teacher I've been to. They were all good drummers but none of them had any idea of how to teach.

    Can anyone recommend a good course on drumming, one that is structured and takes you steadily through each stage up to intermediate level?

    Thanks,

    Paul.
    Welcome aboard, Paul...

    I realize some people are better learning visually and auditory, but if you are going to make any serious progress in your drumming growth, you will have to learn to read music. While you may not necessarily have--or need--a drum score for a rock band, the kind of big band charts Frank (fiacovaz) is talking about DEMAND that you read music. I, too, have virtually all my old music books from nearly 25 years ago and they, too, help me keep my reading skills--and my set chops--sharp, even though I play more hand drums than drum kit.

    Each teacher will go through his course differently, but you've already found that they're emphasizing reading. Until you learn to read music, they could teach you everything else till the cows come home and it won't make as much sense as it will when you learn to read.

    In my experience, there were several books we used that began at beginner and moved on to intermediate levels, but I also learned about symphonic drum duets, rock 'n' roll drumming and Latin rhythms on both set and hand drums...again, man, each teacher will go through his course differently. Go back to the teacher you had (and realize any teacher will be working with school drummers at one time or another), and give it a try again. Good luck, Paul...
    keep the beat goin' ... Don't keep it to yourself!

    Charlie

    "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away." --Henry David Thoreau, "Walden," 1854

    "There's a lot to be said for Time Honored tradition and value." --In memory of Frank "fiacovaz" Iacovazzi

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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by bongobro View Post
    Welcome aboard, Paul...

    I realize some people are better learning visually and auditory, but if you are going to make any serious progress in your drumming growth, you will have to learn to read music. While you may not necessarily have--or need--a drum score for a rock band, the kind of big band charts Frank (fiacovaz) is talking about DEMAND that you read music. I, too, have virtually all my old music books from nearly 25 years ago and they, too, help me keep my reading skills--and my set chops--sharp, even though I play more hand drums than drum kit.

    Each teacher will go through his course differently, but you've already found that they're emphasizing reading. Until you learn to read music, they could teach you everything else till the cows come home and it won't make as much sense as it will when you learn to read.

    In my experience, there were several books we used that began at beginner and moved on to intermediate levels, but I also learned about symphonic drum duets, rock 'n' roll drumming and Latin rhythms on both set and hand drums...again, man, each teacher will go through his course differently. Go back to the teacher you had (and realize any teacher will be working with school drummers at one time or another), and give it a try again. Good luck, Paul...
    Paul...Bongo is right and not just because he agreed with me. He and I both know the value of a Mentor/Teacher.

  11. #11

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    Default Re: What training material to get?

    this may sound silly, but there is about anything you could want to learn on youtube. keep with the reading. it is VERY important if you want to get past garage and bar band scene. but other than that, you can pretty much learn any technique under the sun if you search for "drum lessons" on youtube. some are dvd lessons from the big time stars, but many are just really good private teachers and regular joes that put up some really informative lesson clips. check em out.

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