Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Pedal dimensions

  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Default Pedal dimensions

    hi there! i got a pedal to improve my right foot control at home and i have few questions about it that i think answers will be helpful to other drummers too. thanks for your patience!

    1. my pedal is a second-hand one, so it's springs and chains are in a horrible situation. chain is full of dust and squalor sticked on it's grease, forcing it not to move. springs are not so different, and both of them are covered with rust and mould. what kind of progresses i have to apply and materials to use to make them work like a brand-new-one?

    2. what kind of a material should i use as a pad to get the feeling of a real bass drum? foam? sponge? mouse pad? tennis racket? or something completely different (i guess xD)

    3. what is the optimum spring stress and how can i understand it?

    4. the boss question: what should my pedal's dimensions to give me maximum comfort to use it like a twin or triggered pedal (in the idle position)? please tell me the a, b and c amounts and other important dimensions that i dont know.

  2. #2

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    First off... WELCOME TO DRUMCHAT!

    Secondly... and pardon if I'm very direct... I believe your being a little too scientific in your approach. Most drummers guage the set up and angles of their pedal by "feel" more than measurement. Although you will end up at desired angles, it will be very subjective relative to other factors like the style of your individual pedal, spring tension, size of bass drum, height of beater, how it's clamped to the drum, the size of your leg, how hard you play, how far you sit from the drum, whether you use heel up or heel down (or both), and so much more. If you are to ever play on other drummer's bass drum pedals, you will see that individual preferences vary quite a bit. Experimentation is the best method to determining what suits you personally.

    All that said, and to address your first question, you should clean the "gook" off of the pedal springs and clean the pedal up first and foremost. You may want to even consider replacing the springs with new ones as they might be stretched out if the pedal is very old and/or had a lot of use. I would replace anything that appears worn or disfunctional. Maybe take it to a local drum shop and get them to look at it, clean it up for you, and make suggestions since they'll be able to see it up close. After all that, refer to what I said before: Experiment, experiment, experiment!

    Good luck!
    - Tom

    See the new Drum Bum Store!





    When you shop at Drum Bum or BuyGifts.com, you help with the costs of operating DrumChat.com. Please consider patronizing their fine stores. Whether you need unique music gifts for friends or just want a little something for yourself, Drum Bum is the place!

    For coupons and specials, join the Drum Bum mailing list.

    Buy Gifts for Drummers. And don't miss the free Drum Lessons!

  3. #3

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    Welcome to Drum Chat Redbullah!

    I haven't been playing nearly as long as Drummer, but I can sure say that he's absolutely right about the pedal adjustments. When I take lessons, I play the pedal on the kit at the music store. The owner of the store is my teacher, and he has 40 years of experience on a kit, and yet I don't like the feel of the pedal on the student kit, or the pedal on his kit. I like the feel of the pedal on my kit. It's perfect for me. Get the pedal cleaned up and have some fun (and maybe even a bit of frustration) getting the pedal adjusted just the way you like it. Then it really will be your pedal!
    Quoting gonefishin: Just have some bacon with ya when you go pick her up..........youre an instant chick magnet.





    For coupons and specials, join the Drum Bum mailing list.

    Buy Gifts for Drummers. And don't miss the free Drum Lessons!

  4. #4

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    Hey Red and, Welcome to Drum chat...

    With regards to your excellent questions concerning bass drum pedals, Drummer gave you excellent advise about cleaning up and replacing worn out parts. PB's perspective is typical of individual preferences...what works well for one drummer is not always going to be optimal for another drummer. Your question concerning A - B - C is related to degree of angles relative to playing comfort and performance. Each of these angles can be adjusted individually but, may require a higher - end model that has these particular options available. I use the Tama Iron Cobra Power Glide single pedal HP900. With this pedal, I can adjust Angle B which concerns the foot board and beater. I can also adjust Angle A, the beater only without altering the footboard. Angle C is footboad adjustment only. Each of these components are basically balanced at a 45 degree angle for general purpose playing. A player may, according to style of playing, adjust any one of these simply enough. For instance, if you play with your foot off the pedal and stom down for force, the 45 degree angle may allow the beater to rebound back to far and strike you on the top of your foot as you play. A simple adjustment at Angle A allows you to adjust the beater to a less than 45 degree which actually shortens the stroke and...VOILA, no more sore foot. On the other hand, if you play strictly Heel - Toe and sit farther back from your kit, you can adjust Angle C which would raise the footboard for a more comfortable foot support. Angle B is a nice option as that will adjust the beater without altering the footboard. You would do this if you want a short stroke that will give you even more punch. As for spring tension, that is something you will need to experiment with. When I am wanting to focus on foot strength and speed, I will tighten the spring so that I have to really work my foot. When I get back to playing, I loosen the spring tension and have a much greater foot response because of the harder work at practice. I can get double strokes quite easily and triplet figures on the bas without to great an effort.

    From the sketch you submitted, you might have these adjustments I referred to. Everything I mentioned here comes only from the manual for my pedal and from my own experimentation with the pedal. I hope this answers some of your questions.

  5. #5

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    As a new drummer, only been playing about 1 and a half months, I asked this question as well. I was given some general guidelines but was ultimately told the same thing drummer mentioned "Most drummers guage the set up and angles of their pedal by "feel" more than measurement." My teacher and a few other players I talked with mentioned this same thing to me. What happens if your told to place it in a certain position but its uncomfortable and stressing your foot? Ultimately that hurts you rather than helping you.
    Begin the day with a friendly voice, a companion unobtrusive. - Rush

  6. #6

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    WHOA! thanks for the unique welcome :D i want to thank all of you guys for your interest, and i got the point. i'm looking for fast strokes with the pedal, so i see that a long way of experiment is awaiting...

    by the way, i really want to get an answer for my second question, i looked but didn't see anything about it peace!

  7. #7

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    Welcome RedBullah!!! Do you know why the pedal is in such decrepid condition?
    I like Silver Dragon have only been playing for a little over a month. I still play with my adjustments, not just the bass pedal, but the hi hat as well. Right now, I seem to have a good feel with both. What I have been understanding from this forum, is that a lot is a personal preference. The people here are very helpful. I do not have a private teacher. Just some dvds, books and this forum. This forum has taught me a lot. Easier than opening a book, or sitting in front of a tv. Enjoy yourself here!

  8. #8

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    Red, you didn't say why you need material to feel like a bass drum. However, if you ever look into music stores etc where drums and related gear are sold, you might see a row of various bass drum pedals lined up before a hard rubber bar for test purposes. that seems to be the best for rebounding and power stroking a pedal are concerned.

  9. #9

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    Quote Originally Posted by fiacovaz View Post
    Hey Red and, Welcome to Drum chat...

    With regards to your excellent questions concerning bass drum pedals, Drummer gave you excellent advise about cleaning up and replacing worn out parts. PB's perspective is typical of individual preferences...what works well for one drummer is not always going to be optimal for another drummer. Your question concerning A - B - C is related to degree of angles relative to playing comfort and performance. Each of these angles can be adjusted individually but, may require a higher - end model that has these particular options available. I use the Tama Iron Cobra Power Glide single pedal HP900. With this pedal, I can adjust Angle B which concerns the foot board and beater. I can also adjust Angle A, the beater only without altering the footboard. Angle C is footboad adjustment only. Each of these components are basically balanced at a 45 degree angle for general purpose playing. A player may, according to style of playing, adjust any one of these simply enough. For instance, if you play with your foot off the pedal and stom down for force, the 45 degree angle may allow the beater to rebound back to far and strike you on the top of your foot as you play. A simple adjustment at Angle A allows you to adjust the beater to a less than 45 degree which actually shortens the stroke and...VOILA, no more sore foot. On the other hand, if you play strictly Heel - Toe and sit farther back from your kit, you can adjust Angle C which would raise the footboard for a more comfortable foot support. Angle B is a nice option as that will adjust the beater without altering the footboard. You would do this if you want a short stroke that will give you even more punch. As for spring tension, that is something you will need to experiment with. When I am wanting to focus on foot strength and speed, I will tighten the spring so that I have to really work my foot. When I get back to playing, I loosen the spring tension and have a much greater foot response because of the harder work at practice. I can get double strokes quite easily and triplet figures on the bas without to great an effort.

    From the sketch you submitted, you might have these adjustments I referred to. Everything I mentioned here comes only from the manual for my pedal and from my own experimentation with the pedal. I hope this answers some of your questions.
    HOLA COMO ESTAS FIACOVAZ *FRANK*CREATIVE ARTISTIC DRUMMER ARTIST (CAT) EXCELLENT EXPLANATION**GRACIAS *for your KNOWLEDGE **Too help SOME OF those who REALLY NEED IT**

  10. #10

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    Quote Originally Posted by drummer View Post
    First off... WELCOME TO DRUMCHAT!

    Secondly... and pardon if I'm very direct... I believe your being a little too scientific in your approach. Most drummers guage the set up and angles of their pedal by "feel" more than measurement. Although you will end up at desired angles, it will be very subjective relative to other factors like the style of your individual pedal, spring tension, size of bass drum, height of beater, how it's clamped to the drum, the size of your leg, how hard you play, how far you sit from the drum, whether you use heel up or heel down (or both), and so much more. If you are to ever play on other drummer's bass drum pedals, you will see that individual preferences vary quite a bit. Experimentation is the best method to determining what suits you personally.

    All that said, and to address your first question, you should clean the "gook" off of the pedal springs and clean the pedal up first and foremost. You may want to even consider replacing the springs with new ones as they might be stretched out if the pedal is very old and/or had a lot of use. I would replace anything that appears worn or disfunctional. Maybe take it to a local drum shop and get them to look at it, clean it up for you, and make suggestions since they'll be able to see it up close. After all that, refer to what I said before: Experiment, experiment, experiment!

    Good luck!
    HOLA COMO ESTAS DRUMMER*(TOM) CREATIVE aRTISTIC DRUMMER ARTIST (CAT) GREAT ADVICE (KNOWLEDGE) GRACIAS

  11. #11

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    wow that's too complicated for me, i jus took a small bungee cord and wraped it around the head of the beater and hooked the ends on the foot pad. really builds up the muscles next to your shin and your calf. i also set the spring as tight as i could. it's helped me. try anything and go with what works for you.

  12. #12

    User Info Menu

    Default Re: Pedal dimensions

    Quote Originally Posted by waznad View Post
    wow that's too complicated for me, i jus took a small bungee cord and wraped it around the head of the beater and hooked the ends on the foot pad. really builds up the muscles next to your shin and your calf. i also set the spring as tight as i could. it's helped me. try anything and go with what works for you.
    ************************************************** ***************************

    Hey, that sounds like a pretty good idea...never to old to learn someting new.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •