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Thread: Gene Krupa

  1. #1
    Larrysperf Guest

    Default Gene Krupa

    Why does noone ever talk about Gene Krupa. He was one of the greats

  2. #2

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    Default Re: Gene Krupa

    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=cHr4XQ9SEcg

    No need to add anything else really :-P
    "Then when we do... The Afro Cuban... I'm going to go... To my Coooowwwwbell!" - Bernard Purdie

  3. #3

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    Default Re: Gene Krupa

    He was one of the greatest, always lived in Buddy's shadow but was really amazing in his own right!

  4. #4
    Larrysperf Guest

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    Anyone remeber the parradittle song

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yom View Post
    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=cHr4XQ9SEcg

    No need to add anything else really :-P
    Why'd you post a video of Keith Moon?
    Today, on Ethel The Frog...

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Gene Krupa

    Quote Originally Posted by backtodrum View Post
    He was one of the greatest, always lived in Buddy's shadow but was really amazing in his own right!
    He was around before Buddy wasnt he??

  7. #7
    Larrysperf Guest

    Default Re: Gene Krupa

    I met him once

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mysterious Stan View Post
    He was around before Buddy wasn't he??
    Yes but Buddy stole the light I believe! Buddy started playing professionally at an early age and was a phenomenon very early. He stole some of Gene's thunder.

  9. #9

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    They were conteporaries. Gene was actually murdered at a relatively young age. Buddy lived on up into the 80's. Another monster from that era and still living is Louis Bellson. His chops were easily on Par with Gene and Buddy. There are videos of the three drumming together.

    all the best...

  10. #10

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  11. #11

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    I think Buddy was the better drummer but I prefer Gene's style. Does Krupa remind you of anyone DC people???

    Give you a clue - He was mad!
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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by kay-gee View Post
    They were conteporaries. Gene was actually murdered at a relatively young age. Buddy lived on up into the 80's. Another monster from that era and still living is Louis Bellson. His chops were easily on Par with Gene and Buddy. There are videos of the three drumming together.

    all the best...
    *********************************************

    Gene Krupa died in 1973 ...heart attack. Buddy Rich died at the age of 70 in 1987...heart failure following brain tumor surgery.
    There's a lot to be said for Time Honored tradition and value.

    http://i274.photobucket.com/albums/j...vaz/TheSet.jpg

  13. #13

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    Default Re: Gene Krupa

    I stand corrected. I thought Gene met with some kind of misfortune (foul play). perhaps confusing him with someone else.

    all the best...

  14. #14

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    Sal Mineo Who Played Gene In The Movie "Gene Krupa" Was Murdered
    Last edited by PHROGGE; 10-25-2008 at 06:09 PM.
    "FEEL DA GROOVE & PLAY IT FORWARD..."

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    ENJOY IT ALL,,, MY BROTHERS & SISTERS"

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    & FORCE BEHIND DA
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    (AND OTHER TOYZ)

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larrysperf View Post
    Why does noone ever talk about Gene Krupa. He was one of the greats
    HOLA como estas LARRYSPERF MI AMIGO CREATIVE ARTISTIC DRUMMER ARTIST(CAT) *I have posted VIDS of GENE'S AMAZING CRETIVE ARTISTRY *THAT CAT was Extremmmxxxx SHOWMAN ROJO CALIENTE PERFORMER**Loved his Whole approach within all of HIS very creative artistic ARTISTRY***GRACIAS

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethel_The_Frog View Post
    Why'd you post a video of Keith Moon?
    funny man funny.



    Official cowbell hater.

  17. #17

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    Default Re: Gene Krupa

    Quote Originally Posted by Larrysperf View Post
    Why does noone ever talk about Gene Krupa. He was one of the greats
    ___________________
    HOLA como estas Mi amigo LARRYSPERF *CREATIVE ARTISTIC
    DRUMMER ARTIST(CAT) ALWAYS LOVED GENE'S AMAZING AND VERY CRETIVE ARTISTIC ARTISTRY*****
    Eugene Bertram Krupa was born to Polish parents in Chicago, Illinois. He began playing professionally in the mid 1920s with bands in Wisconsin. He broke into the Chicago scene in 1927, when he was picked by MCA to become a member of "Thelma Terry and Her Playboys", the first notable American Jazz band (outside of all-girl bands) to be led by a female musician. The Playboys were the house band at The Golden Pumpkin nightclub in Chicago and also toured extensively throughout the eastern and central United States.

    Krupa made his first recordings in 1927, with a band under the leadership of banjoist Eddie Condon and "fixer" (and sometime singer, who did not appear on the records), Red McKenzie: along with other recordings beginning in 1924 by musicians known in the "Chicago" scene such as Bix Beiderbecke, these sides are examples of white "Chicago Style" jazz. The numbers recorded at that session were: 'China Boy', 'Sugar', 'Nobody's Sweetheart' and 'Liza'. The McKenzie - Condon sides are also notable for being the first records to feature a full drum kit. Eddie Condon describes what happened in the Okeh studio on that day (in 'We Called It Music' - pub: Peter Davis, 1948):

    Mezzrow (Milton "Mezz" Mezzrow) was helping Krupa set up his drums. 'What are you going to do with those?' Rockwell (Okeh's 'A&R' man in the 1920's) asked. 'Play them,' Krupa said simply. Rockwell shook his head. 'You can't do that,' he said. 'You'll ruin our equipment. All we've ever used on records are snare drums and cymbals.' Krupa, who had been practicing every day at home, looked crushed. 'How about letting us try them?' I asked. 'The drums are the backbone of the band. They hold us up.' I could see that Rockwell was leery of the whole business; drums or no drums, I figured, we are probably going to get tossed out. 'Let the kids try it', McKenzie said. 'If they go wrong I'll take the rap'. I didn't know until long afterwards that Red had guaranteed our pay for the job'...
    Quietly we waited for the playback. When it came, pounding out through the big speaker, we listened stiffly for a moment. We had never been an audience for ourselves...Rockwell came out of the control-room smiling. 'We'll have to get some more of this... (Rockwell nodded towards Krupa): didn't bother the equipment at all,' he said. 'I think we've got something,'.


    Krupa also appeared on six recordings made by the Thelma Terry band in 1928.[1].

    Krupa studied with Sanford A. Moeller.

    In 1929 he moved to New York City and worked with the band of Red Nichols. In 1934 he joined Benny Goodman's band, where his featured drum work especially on the hit "Sing, Sing, Sing" made him a national celebrity. In 1938, after a public fight with Goodman at the Earl Theater in Philadelphia, he left Goodman to launch his own band and had several hits with singer Anita O'Day and trumpeter Roy Eldridge. Krupa made a memorable cameo appearance in the 1941 film Ball of Fire, in which he and his band performed an extended version of the hit Drum Boogie.



    Gene Krupa Drive in Yonkers, NY
    In 1943, Krupa was arrested for possession of marijuana and was given a 3 month jail sentence.[2] After his release, Krupa reorganized his band with a big string section, featuring Charlie Ventura on sax. It was one of the largest dance bands of the era, sometimes containing up to forty musicians. He gradually cut down the size of the band in the late 1940s, and from 1951 on led a trio or quartet, often featuring the multi-instrumentalist Eddie Shu on tenor sax, clarinet and harmonica. He appeared regularly with the Jazz At the Philharmonic shows.

    [edit] Death
    He continued to perform in the 1960s even in famous clubs like the Metropole near Times Square in New York. Krupa retired in the late 1960s, although he occasionally played in public in the early 1970s until shortly before his death from leukemia and heart failure in Yonkers, New York at age sixty-four. He was buried in Holy Cross Cemetery in Calumet City, Illinois.

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